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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. WASH in schools empowers girls’ education in Masbate Province and Metro Manila, Philippines: An assessment of menstrual hygiene management in schools

    Emory University, UNICEF Philippines, Plan Philippines and Save the Children Philippines carried out a qualitative assessment of menstruation-related challenges girls face in school. Girls, boys, teachers and mothers at 10 schools in Masbate Province and the National Capital Region were interviewed for their opinions. This report highlights the challenges girls face in school during menses, describes the determinants of these challenges, and outlines the educational and health impacts of these challenges as voiced by the participants. …

  2. Menstruation, sanitary products and school attendance: Evidence from a randomized evaluation

    Policy-makers have cited menstruation and lack of sanitary products as barriers to girls' schooling. We evaluate these claims using a randomized evaluation of sanitary products provision to girls in Nepal. We report two findings. First, menstruation has a very small impact on school attendance: we estimate that girls miss a total of 0.4 days in a 180 day school year. Second, improved sanitary technology has no effect on reducing this (small) gap: girls who randomly received sanitary products were no less likely to miss school during their period. …

  3. Economic impact of HIV and antiretroviral therapy on education supply in high prevalence regions

    Background: We set out to estimate, for the three geographical regions with the highest HIV prevalence, (sub-Saharan Africa [SSA], the Caribbean and the Greater Mekong sub-region of East Asia), the human resource and economic impact of HIV on the supply of education from 2008 to 2015, the target date for the achievement of Education For All (EFA), contrasting the continuation of access to care, support and Antiretroviral therapy (ART) to the scenario of universal access. …

  4. The impact of HIV/AIDS on children and young people: Reviewing research conducted and distilling implications for the education sector in Asia

    This paper aims to take a closer look at the impact of the epidemic on children (0-18 years old), which is growing, by reviewing and synthesizing several research studies that have been conducted over the years in the Asia-Pacific region. …

  5. Reaching the Poor: The 'cost' of sending children to school: a six country comparative study

    This comparative research study focuses on the main barriers to education for the poorest households in Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Kenya, Uganda and Zambia. Although the study set out primarily to look at the burden of education costs on the poorest households very rich data on other barriers to education (e.g. physical access, quality of education, vulnerability, poverty, and health) have been gathered and are discussed. The study looks at what motivates parents to send their children to school (and keep them there) through their perceptions of the quality and value of education. …

  6. An assessment of the impact of HIV/AIDS on the education sector in Nepal

    This report presents the main findings of a comprehensive assessment of the impact of HIV/AIDS on the education sector in Nepal. The report focuses on the following three key questions: What is the actual and likely impact of HIV/AIDS on teachers and other MOES staff? What is the actual and likely impact on the education of primary and secondary school students who are directly affected by the epidemic? What has been and what should be done in the future to prevent HIV infection among teachers and students as well as support for all those who are directly affected by the epidemic?

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