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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. School report Scotland: the experiences of lesbian, gay, bi and trans young people in Scotland's schools in 2017

    In 2016 Stonewall commissioned the Centre for Family Research at the University of Cambridge to conduct a survey with young people who are lesbian, gay, bi or trans (or think they might be) on their experiences in secondary schools and colleges across Britain. Between November 2016 and February 2017, 3,713 LGBT young people aged between 11-19, including 402 living in Scotland, completed an online questionnaire. This report represents the responses of these participants living in Scotland. …

  2. School report: the experiences of lesbian, gay, bi and trans young people in Britain’s schools in 2017

    In 2016 Stonewall commissioned the Centre for Family Research at the University of Cambridge to conduct a survey with young people who are lesbian, gay, bi or trans (LGBT), or who think they might be, on their experiences in secondary schools and colleges across Britain. Between November 2016 and February 2017, 3,713 LGBT young people aged 11-19 completed an online questionnaire, and this report presents the findings of this survey. This study is the third School Report published by Stonewall, and marks ten years since the publication of the first study in 2007. …

  3. School report Cymru: the experiences of lesbian, gay, bi and trans young people in Wales’ schools in 2017

    In 2016 Stonewall commissioned the Centre for Family Research at the University of Cambridge to conduct a survey with young people who are lesbian, gay, bi or trans (or think they might be) on their experiences in secondary schools and colleges across Britain. Between November 2016 and February 2017, 3,713 LGBT young people aged between 11-19, including 267 living in Wales, completed an online questionnaire. This report represents the responses of these participants living in Wales. …

  4. Impact of teachers training on HIV/AIDS education program among secondary school students in Bangladesh: A cross-sectional survey

    In 2007, the Government of Bangladesh incorporated a chapter on HIV/AIDS into the national curriculum for an HIV-prevention program for school students. For the efficient dissemination of knowledge, an intervention was designed to train the teachers and equip them to educate on the topic of HIV/AIDS. The present study intended to understand the impact of this intervention by assessing the knowledge, attitudes and behaviours related to HIV/AIDS, among the targeted students.

  5. Menstruation as a barrier to education?

    Increasing education for girls is an important policy priority in many developing countries, where secondary school enrollment often remains lower for girls than for boys. Some researchers and policymakers have argued that menstruation may be causing girls to miss a significant number of school days. At the maximum, some have estimated that girls might be missing as much as 10 to 20 percent of school days due to menstruation. Anecdotal evidence seems to support this. Girls report missing school during their periods and lacking access to modern sanitary products. …

  6. HIV prevention in Mexican schools: prospective randomised evaluation of intervention

    Objective: To assess effects on condom use and other sexual behaviour of an HIV prevention programme at school that promotes the use of condoms with and without emergency contraception. […] Intervention: Schools were randomised to one of three arms: an HIV prevention course that promoted condom use, the same course with emergency contraception as back-up, or the existing sex education course. Self administered anonymous questionnaires were completed at baseline, four months, and 16 months. …

  7. Creating village champions for girls’ education

    Families, communities and village governments are often the key decision-makers regarding girls’ lives. They can also be the most difficult to persuade in terms of delaying girls’ marriages. Their support can ensure that changes initiated by Samata are sustained well after the end of the programme.

  8. Fostering adolescent girl leaders

    At the heart of the Samata intervention is the development of a cadre of adolescent girl leaders who will sustain changes in favour of girls’ education and gender equality in their villages. The programme mentors girls to become confident and vocal young feminists, active in their communities and schools. Samata aims to equip them with the knowledge and skills to effectively negotiate a space that is hostile to women. Overall, the Samata programme has reached 3,600 girls across 69 villages in 2 districts of Bagalkot and Bijapur in northern Karnataka.

  9. Mentoring adolescent boys to reduce gender-based violence

    According to the theory of change that underlies the Samata programme, one important factor in keeping girls in school is to reduce gender-based violence by their male peers. This brief explains how Samata works with adolescent boys.

  10. From paper to practice: sexuality education policies and their implementation in Ghana

    This report provides a detailed snapshot of how the policies related to sexuality education in Ghana are translated into practice and what students, teachers and heads of schools think about them. Data from official documents, key informant interviews and school-based surveys were used to examine how sexuality education programs in three regions were developed, implemented and experienced. …

  11. From paper to practice: sexuality education policies and their implementation in Kenya

    This report provides a snapshot of how sexuality education policies in Kenya are translated into practice in secondary schools, and what students, teachers and principals think about them. Data from official documents, key informant interviews and school-based surveys were used to examine how sexuality education programs in three counties were developed, implemented and experienced. …

  12. Factors shaping trajectories to child and early marriage: evidence from Young Lives in India

    The 2011 Census in India reported that nearly 17 million children between the ages of 10 and 19 –6% of the age group – are married, with girls constituting the majority (76 per cent), although there has been a significant relative reduction in the marriage of girls under 14. The aim of this paper is to better understand the individual, household and community factors that explain the different pathways to marriage among Young Lives children, drawing upon both descriptive statistics from the household survey as well as in-depth qualitative research with the study children.

  13. From teasing to torment: school climate revisited a survey of U.S. secondary school students and teachers

    This document provides an in-depth look at the current landscape of bias and peer victimization as reported by students and teachers from across the nation. In addition to examining various types of bias, including those based on race/ethnicity, religion, body size, and ability, this report provides a focused look at LGBTQ issues in secondary schools. Comparing findings to a similar survey conducted in 2005, the report discusses the progress that has been made over the past ten years, as well as highlights the challenges that remain. …

  14. ‘It is not all about sex’: young people’s views about sexuality and relationships education

    The Engaging Young People in Sexuality Education (EYPSE) research project lead by Emeritus Professor Bruce Johnson addresses two questions: What are young people’s views on school-based sexuality and relationships education? In what ways could sexuality and relationships education be improved? The report focuses on findings from the first stage of the research project, consisting of an online survey of over 2,000 students in 31 secondary schools in South Australia and Victoria. The research was conducted in government secondary schools in South Australia (14) and Victoria (17). …

  15. Is there a need for a European-wide initiative on comprehensive sexuality education? Reflections from Croatia

    This commentary concerns the policy brief published in this issue (European Expert Group on Sexuality Education 2015). It reflects the author’s experiences with the outcomes of efforts to introduce sexuality education in Croatia, followed by a brief history of events related to the recent introduction of sexuality education in Croatian primary and secondary schools.

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