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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Advancing human rights, equality and inclusive governance to end AIDS: supporting countries to implement the recommendations of the Global Commission on HIV and the Law

    Despite the significant progress in scaling up work on HIV human rights, violations and stigma remain serious barriers to better HIV and health responses. Greater focus on protecting, upholding and fulfilling the rights of people living with HIV and those most affected is essential for delivering on the pledge made by Member States in Agenda 2030 to leave no one behind. The Global Commission on HIV and the Law issued its landmark report in July 2012 and made several recommendations how the law can be used to respond to HIV in an evidence informed, rights based manner. …

  2. Punitive laws, key population size estimates, and Global AIDS Response Progress Reports: an ecological study of 154 countries

    UN global plans on HIV/AIDS have committed to reducing the number of countries with punitive laws criminalizing key populations. This study explores whether punitive laws are associated with countries’ performance on targets set in the global plans. As a result, it states that a significantly larger proportion of countries that criminalize same-sex sexual behaviour reported implausibly low size estimates or no size estimates for MSM. …

  3. Public support for transgender rights: a twenty-three country survey

    Transgender rights have emerged as a central feature in the discourse on LGBT rights in many countries; however, little is known about public support for such rights around the globe. This report presents findings from a ground-breaking survey of 17,105 adults across 23 countries about their attitudes towards transgender people and transgender rights.

  4. All five fingers are not the same. Discrimination on grounds of gender identity and sexual orientation in Sri Lanka

    In Sri Lanka, ideas about the way men and women should look and act are deeply entrenched. Transgender people and others who challenge gender norms—including many lesbian, gay, bisexual, and intersex people—face a range of abuses from state officials and private individuals that compromise the quality and safety of their daily lives, and their ability to access services that are central to realizing basic human rights. …

  5. Interventions to prevent child marriage among young people in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review of the published and gray literature

    Child marriage, defined as marriage before the age of 18 years, is a human rights violation that can have lasting adverse educational and economic impacts. The objective of this review was to identify high-quality interventions and evaluations to decease child marriage in low- and middle-income countries. PubMed, Embase, PsycInfo, CINAHL Plus, Popline, and the Cochrane Databases were searched without language limitations for articles published through November 2015. Gray literature was searched by hand. Reference tracing was used, as well as the unpacking of systematic reviews. …

  6. HIV and AIDS: a deep human concern. A compilation of lectures and presentations from the annual Irish Aid professor Father Michael Kelly lecture series 2006-2015

    Originally hailing from Tullamore, Ireland, Professor Father Michael Kelly has spent more than 50 years living and working in Zambia, where he is now a citizen. Since 2006, the Irish Aid Professor Fr. Michael Kelly Lecture on HIV and AIDS has been held annually to honour his lifetime contributions to tackling HIV and AIDS, and to reducing their associated stigma, discrimination, and impacts on human rights. …

  7. Being LGBT in Asia: Thailand country report. A participatory review and analysis of the legal and social environment for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) persons and civil society

    This report provides an overview of LGBT rights in Thailand as related broadly to laws and policies, social and cultural attitudes, and religion; and more specifically to employment and housing, education and young people, health and well-being, family and society, media and information communication technology (ICT), and the organizational capacity of LGBT organizations.

  8. Being LGBT in Asia: the Philippines country report. A participatory review and analysis of the legal and social environment for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) persons and civil society

    Being LGBT in Asia: the Philippines Country Report provides an overview of LGBT rights in the Philippines including the effects of laws, policies, culture and social attitudes, and religion, based on research, consultation and the National LGBT Community Dialogue. This overview is followed by an examination of the Philippines experience of protecting the rights of LGBT people under eight different areas: education, health, employment, family affairs, religion, community, media and politics, using the same methodology as described above. …

  9. Being LGBT in Asia: Mongolia country report. A participatory review and analysis of the legal and social environment for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) persons and civil society

    This report presents an overview of LGBT rights in Mongolia as well as background about the legal, institutional, cultural and social environment in which Mongolia’s LGBT community lives. The report also analyses the role of international human rights mechanisms in promoting the rights of LGBT persons in the country. With respect to day-to-day living, the report examines employment, education, health, family affairs and media. Finally, the report looks at the development of Mongolia’s LGBT community and the capacity of organizations working on LGBT issues.

  10. Ending violence and other human rights violations based on sexual orientation and gender identity. A joint dialogue of the African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights and United Nations

    On 3 November 2015, a joint dialogue on sexual orientation and gender identity was held between the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights (African Commission or ACHPR), Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (Inter-American Commission or IACHR), and United Nations (UN) human rights mechanisms in Banjul, The Gambia, ahead of the 57th ordinary session of the African Commission. The dialogue hosted by the African Commission was supported and organised by the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS). …

  11. Report of the regional dialogue on LGBTI human rights and health in Asia-Pacific

    The report documents the presentations and discussions made during the Regional Dialogue on LGBTI Human Rights and Health in Asia-Pacific held from 25–27 February 2015 at the United Nations Conference Centre in Bangkok, Thailand. The Regional Dialogue, which brought together more than 200 representatives from over 30 countries, was an important step in building consensus and strengthening the movement for legal and social change to advance the human rights of LGBTI people in Asia and the Pacific. It aimed to identify opportunities, build trust, and promote innovation and action. …

  12. Human rights and the HIV response: a rapid assessment of human rights violations in the context of HIV, in the Eastern and Southern Africa region, and a review of current approaches to protecting and promoting human rights for an effective HIV response

    Key populations, specifically people who sell sex (PWSS), people who inject drugs (PWID) and lesbian, and gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) people experience significant human rights violations which underpin the continued high HIV incidence in these populations. This rapid assessment of human rights violations in Eastern and southern Africa focuses on three priority key populations – PWSS, LGBTI (including MSM), and PWID. The report outlines the normative international treaties that establish a basis for a human rights framework for the HIV response.

  13. Our time to be heard: stories giving voice to young people and their experience of HIV

    This publication is a collection of stories about young people living with HIV written by citizen journalists from the Key Correspondents network. The authors hope that they bring the experiences, thoughts and reflections of young people to the growing global debates on adolescent health and HIV. Key Correspondents is a network of citizen journalists around the world writing on HIV, health and human rights, helping get the voices of those most affected into global debates.

  14. Ending violence and discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people

    Joint statement from twelve United Nations entities calling for an end to violence and discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) people. The joint statement highlights the UN’s inter-agency commitment on working with Member States to protect, respect and fulfil the right of LGBTI people to live free from violence, persecution, discrimination and stigma. It also calls on countries to repeal discriminatory laws.

  15. Sexual health, human rights and the law

    This report demonstrates the relationship between sexual health, human rights and the law. Drawing from a review of public health evidence and extensive research into human rights law at international, regional and national levels, the report shows how states in different parts of the world can and do support sexual health through legal and other mechanisms that are consistent with human rights standards and their own human rights obligations.

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