• Twitter
  • RSS

UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

Search resources

The search found 104 results in 0.026 seconds.

Search results

  1. Quality standards for effective alcohol and drug education

    Alcohol and drug education is a statutory part of the science curriculum for schools in England, and this can be built on through the Personal Social and Health Education (PSHE) curriculum. By building pupils’ resilience, values and skills around alcohol and drugs, teachers help young people to develop the life skills to enter adulthood healthy and avoiding harms. These standards are designed to help schools and those that work with schools to shape the context and delivery of alcohol and drug education. …

  2. International standards on drug use prevention

    These global international standards summarize the currently available scientific evidence, describing interventions and policies that have been found to result in positive prevention outcomes and their characteristics. Concurrently, the global International Standards identify the major components and features of an effective national drug prevention system. It is [the autors’] hope that international standards will guide policymakers worldwide to develop programmes, policies and systems that are a truly effective investment in the future of children, young people, families and communities. …

  3. National policy: tackling substance abuse

    The overall aim of these procedures is to protect students from substance abuse in schools. In particular they aim: - To provide educational and care personnel with a practical tool that enables them to intervene in an appropriate manner when substance is found or used in schools. …

  4. Step by step: preparing for work with children and young people who inject drugs. A tool for harm reduction service providers

    This resource is intended for harm reduction service providers with limited experience of working with children and young people who inject drugs. …

  5. Addictive substances: textbook approaches from 16 countries

    Schools have been identified as one of the appropriate settings for addiction prevention since this is the place where pupils may come into contact with drugs for the first time and experiment with them, with the possibility of becoming addicted. To be effective, school-based drug education must be firmly based on knowledge of oneself and knowledge of the effects of various addictive substances. Biology education is then an essential part of schoolbased drug education. …

  6. Ghana education service: a teacher's guide on the prevention of drug abuse in schools

    The Teachers Guide begins with a preface, an acknowledgement and brief introduction, and is followed by guidelines on how to use the curriculum in schools. Part II provides an overview of the drug situation in Ghana and Part III discusses the social and psychological factors affecting drug use by young people. Part IV lists some useful resources and other information for teachers. There are two annexes: one dealing with Drug Education, Life Skills and Positive Prevention, and the other containing some short stories written about the effects of drug abuse. …

  7. Delivering youth-led peer education: a guide to facilitate youth-led workshops on sexual health and drug-related harm reduction

    This guide was developed as part of the international ‘Educate, empower and engage for healthy lives’ project. This guide was developed by a team of young people with personal experience as a young person who uses drugs and/or work with vulnerable young people. The guide was developed by the project team and then piloted in 4 countries (Kyrgyzstan, Mexico, Nigeria, and Portugal). …

  8. The impacts of drug policies on children and young people

    As member states of the United Nations take stock of the drug control system, a number of debates have emerged among governments about how to balance international drug laws with human rights, public health, alternatives to incarceration, and experimentation with regulation. This series intends to provide a primer on why governments must not turn a blind eye to pressing human rights and public health impacts of current drug policies.

  9. The 2011 ESPAD report. Substance use among students in 36 European countries

    The main purpose of the European School Survey Project on Alcohol and Other Drugs (ESPAD) is to collect comparable data on substance use among 15–16-year-old European students in order to monitor trends within as well as between countries. So far, five data-collection waves have been conducted in the framework of the project. The first study was carried out in 26 countries in 1995, while data collection in 2011 was performed in 37 countries. …

  10. HIV and young people who inject drugs. Technical brief

    This technical brief is one in a series addressing four young key populations. It is intended for policy-makers, donors, service-planners, service-providers and community-led organizations. This brief aims to catalyse and inform discussions about how best to provide health services, programmes and support for young people who inject drugs. …

  11. Schools. School-based education for drug abuse prevention

    For some decades now students have been given lessons about drugs in school in the belief that education about drugs can change their behaviour. This publication discusses basic principles upon which policy makers, school administrators and teachers can make decisions on how to plan, implement, monitor and evaluate school-based drug prevention programmes.

  12. Substance use prevention in educational settings in Eastern Europe and Central Asia: a review of policies and practices

    Promoting health and a healthy lifestyle among children and youth is a national priority for all Eastern European and Central Asian countries, and is reflected in their country policies. Schools have an important role to play in health promotion, by preparing children, adolescents and youth for a healthy and safe adulthood. This review of policies and practices provides a brief account of the achievements to date in prevention education (with special focus on drug use prevention), and outlines the challenges still to be addressed.

  13. Drugs guidance for schools in Northern Ireland

    It is a statutory requirement for all schools in Northern Ireland to have a drugs policy and publish details in relation to the policy in their prospectus; deliver drugs education to include legal and illegal substances; and inform the Police Service of Northern Ireland if they believe or suspect a pupil to be in possession of a controlled substance. The guidance has been designed to assist schools in the development, implementation, evaluation, and review of their drugs policy and to support procedures for the management of suspected drug-related incidents and issues.

  14. Ministry of education policy in drugs and substance abuse

    The purpose of this policy is to provide a framework for the prevention, intervention and elimination of the use of illegal drugs and abuse of legal drugs in schools.

  15. Drug prevention programmes in schools: what is the evidence?

    Key messages: Universal drug education programmes in schools have been shown to have an impact on the most common substances used by young people: alcohol, tobacco and cannabis. The approaches which appear to be most effective are those based on social influences and life skills, for example Life Skills Training and Unplugged. Interventions which are not drug-specific but focus on children and young people’s attachment to school can also be effective in reducing substance misuse. The Good Behaviour Game is one example of these. …

Pages

Our mission

Providing a comprehensive knowledge base and information exchange service to support the development of effective HIV and AIDS, school health and sexuality education policies, programmes and advocacy within the education sector.