Oslo: Norwegian Centre for International Environment and Development Studies, 2002. 46 p.
Authors: 
Ennals, A. M.
Rauan, E. C.
Description: 
The report looks into the status, impact and preventive actions taken by some of the partner universities and colleges in Africa of Agricultural University of Norway (NLH) against the spread of HIV/AIDS. Countries included in the study are Botswana, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Kenya, South Africa, Uganda, Malawi and Tanzania.The report finds:* there is a growing recognition of the problem on campus* most universities have established special HIV/AIDS Committees and have information campaigns to new students* little is included in research and curriculum development* no one is making projections of what future losses of staff and students will mean for the university or the agricultural sector* successful institutional and societal responses to HIV/AIDS require leadership and universities play a role in the leadership of their communitiesBased on the study, the report makes the following recommendations:Expressed Needs from Universities and Colleges: The needs expressed by most universities are curriculum development and regional networking. Due to the nature of the problem, the universities were concerned in having interdisciplinary and multilevel research. NORAD on the other hand has a key role in helping to fight the pandemic. The involvement is basically facilitating, coordination and support of current and future programs through:* integration of HIV/AIDS dimension in institutional collaboration agreements* contribute to research development by facilitating an interdisciplinary collaboration between Norwegian institutions and the African counterparts* support curriculum development initiatives, student peer education and outreaches, maintain current university operations through filling projected decrease in staff in students* and lastly being instrumental in creating a node in Norway that coordinates and acts as a clearinghouse for HIV/ AIDS and agriculture
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IIEP