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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. The impact of HIV/AIDS on children and young people: Reviewing research conducted and distilling implications for the education sector in Asia

    This paper aims to take a closer look at the impact of the epidemic on children (0-18 years old), which is growing, by reviewing and synthesizing several research studies that have been conducted over the years in the Asia-Pacific region. …

  2. Estimates of the Impact of HIV and teacher ART take-up on the Education Sector on the achievement of EFA in Rwanda

    This impact analysis revealed that the number of HIV positive teachers is likely to increase, as could AIDS mortality and absenteeism. ART, particularly second-line ART could reduce these problems and save money. HIV prevalence in Rwandan teachers could reach 12% by 2015. Considerable effort is required to reduce pupil-teacher ratios and increase orphan school attendance. Rwanda can celebrate its successes in increasing net enrolment.

  3. The impact of the AIDS epidemic on schooling in sub-Saharan Africa

    This report assesses the actual and likely impacts of HIV/AIDS epidemic on schooling in sub-Saharan Africa. In particular, it reviews available evidence concerning the school attendance of orphans and morbidity and mortality among teachers in high prevalence countries. The main conclusion is that, while the epidemic poses a sizeable threat to the provision of basic and other education and training in some African countries, the likely overall impact of the epidemic in the continent as a whole will not be as catastrophic as has been widely suggested.

  4. Reasons for non-attendance of orphans, children from disjointed families who live with both parents: Evidence from questionnaires and children's drawings

    The paper uses a combination of questionnaire data and children's drawings to explore the reasons contributing to temporary and permanent absence from school of orphans, children from disjointed families and children who live with both parents. Particular attention is paid to differences between these three groups of children and between girls and boys. It is shown that the most important reasons for absenteeism are closely related to poverty, and that poverty is not necessarily related to orphanhood. …

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