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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Accessing the ‘right’ kinds of material and symbolic capital: the role of cash transfers in reducing adolescent school absence and risky behaviour in South Africa

    This article investigates how well South Africa’s Child Support Grant (CSG) responds to the material and psychosocial needs of adolescents, and the resultant effects on schooling and risky behaviour. One driver of schooling decisions is shame related to poverty and the ‘social cost’ of school, where a premium must often be paid for fashionable clothes or accessories. The other driver relates to symbolic and consumptive capital gained through engaging in sexual exchange relationships. The anticipated impacts from the CSG are partial because of these non-material drivers of adolescent choices. …

  2. The social demand for schooling in HIV/AIDS affected populations in Tanzania: summary results from a field survey

    This paper justifies and explores the results of a social demand survey for primary school enrolment in Tanzania. This records and analyses the evidence derived from a structured household-based survey in rural and urban school catchments in two regions of the country (Iringa and Dodoma) with children and their guardians which explores the social demand for primary schooling, especially in relation to household poverty indices and changing labour in households affected by prolonged illness and death. …

  3. Reasons for non-attendance of orphans, children from disjointed families who live with both parents: Evidence from questionnaires and children's drawings

    The paper uses a combination of questionnaire data and children's drawings to explore the reasons contributing to temporary and permanent absence from school of orphans, children from disjointed families and children who live with both parents. Particular attention is paid to differences between these three groups of children and between girls and boys. It is shown that the most important reasons for absenteeism are closely related to poverty, and that poverty is not necessarily related to orphanhood. …

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