• Twitter
  • RSS

UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

Search resources

The search found 11 results in 0.03 seconds.

Search results

  1. Education, HIV, and early fertility: experimental evidence from Kenya

    A seven-year randomized evaluation suggests education subsidies reduce adolescent girls’ dropout, pregnancy, and marriage but not sexually transmitted infection (STI). The government’s HIV curriculum, which stresses abstinence until marriage, does not reduce pregnancy or STI. Both programs combined reduce STI more, but cut dropout and pregnancy less, than education subsidies alone. …

  2. Adapting a multifaceted U.S. HIV prevention education program for girls in Ghana

    We adapted a U.S. HIV prevention program to address knowledge gaps and cultural pressures that increase the risk of infection in adolescent Ghanaian girls. The theory-based nine-module HIV prevention program combines didactics and games, an interactive computer program about sugar daddies, and tie-and-dye training to demonstrate an economic alternative to transactional sex. The abstinence-based study was conducted in a church-affiliated junior secondary school in Nsawam, Ghana. Of 61 subjects aged 10-14 in the prevention program, over two thirds were very worried about becoming HIV infected. …

  3. Education, HIV, and early fertility: experimental evidence from Kenya

    We provide experimental evidence on the relationships between education, HIV/AIDS education, risky behavior and early fertility in Kenya. We exploit randomly assigned variation in the cost of schooling and in exposure to the national HIV/AIDS prevention curriculum for a cohort of over 19,000 adolescents in Western Kenya, originally aged 13.5 on average. We collected data on the schooling, marriage, and fertility out-comes of these students over 7 years, and tested them for HIV and Herpes (HSV2) after 7 years. …

  4. Young people's perspectives on the adoption of preventive measures for HIV/AIDS, malaria and family planning in South-West Uganda: focus group study

    The aim of the study was to explore young people's understanding and knowledge about why protective measures against HIV/AIDS, malaria and unplanned pregnancy are not taken by those at risk in Uganda. The study results were that the participants (all from secondary school in Kanungu Uganda) could identify reasons why preventive action was not taken. These reasons included misconceptions, the inpracticability of abstinence, and fear of side effects of several key interventions. The article argues that there is an apportunity to improve preventive measures by tackling these issues. …

  5. Do teenagers respond to HIV risk information? Evidence from a field experiment in Kenya

    We use a randomized experiment to test whether and what information changes teenagers' sexual behavior in Kenya. Providing information on the relative risk of HIV infection by partner's age led to a 28 percent decrease in teen pregnancy, an objective proxy for the incidence of unprotected sex. Self-reported sexual behavior data suggests substitution away from older (riskier) partners and toward same-age partners. In contrast, the official abstinence-only HIV curriculum had no impact on teen pregnancy. …

  6. Increased sexual abstinence among in-school adolescents as a result of school health education in Soroti district, Uganda

    A health education program conducted in primary schools in Soroti district, Uganda promoted increased access to information, better peer interactions and better quality of the health education system. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among students in their final year of primary school (average age 14 years) at baseline and two years after introduction of the intervention. The percentage of sexually active students decreased from 42.9% (123 out of 287) to 11.1% (31 out of 280) in the intervention arm, while no changes were observed in the control arm. …

  7. Sociodemographic variations in communication on sexuality and HIV/AIDS with parents, family members and teachers among in-school adolescents: a multi-site study in Tanzania and South Africa

    This paper aims to identify with whom in-school adolescents preferred to communicate about sexuality, and to study adolescents' communication on HIV/AIDS, abstinence and condoms with parents/guardians, other adult family members, and teachers. Data were obtained from a baseline questionnaire survey carried out in South Africa (Cape Town and Mankweng) and Tanzania (Dar es Salaam) in early 2004. We analysed data for 14,944 adolescents from 80 randomly selected schools. The mean ages were as follows: CapeTown, 13.38 years (standard deviation (SD). …

  8. Discovering the potential of girl guides: 12 peer education sessions

    The Kenya Girl Guides Association implements an integrated program on Life Skills and Peer Education in schools. Adult Guide Leaders conduct Life Skills sessions with Guides in Girl Guide Units in each participating school. Over the three terms or trimesters, 24 hours of sessions are held on 12 topics. The sessions help Girl Guides to learn about and explore the topics for themselves. Each Guide Unit has about 50 Girl Guides and four Patrol Leaders - an informed and sizeable group that can reach the rest of the school in a positive way. …

  9. Discovering the potential of girl guides in schools: a life skills curriculum for guide leaders

    From 1999 to 2006, Kenya Girl Guides Association received support from Family Health International (FHI) and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) to integrate HIV and AIDS prevention into more than 700 Guide Units in three regions: Coast, Rift Valley, and Western. From 2006 to 2009, KGGA will improve the Guide programme in the existing 366 schools and expand to more than 900 new schools (mostly at the primary level) in Coast and Rift Valley provinces, with support from FHI through the AIDS, Population, and Health Integrated Assistance (APHIA II) Program. …

  10. Our future. Teaching sexuality and life-skills. A guide for teachers using Our future pupils' books.

    "Teaching sexuality and life-skills" is part of the Our future series of pupils' and teachers' books published by International HIV/AIDS Alliance in 2008 . These resources are aimed at teachers and anyone else interested in teaching sexuality and life skills in the community; for example, peer educators, health practitioners, traditional and religious leaders and parents. The series is a result of collaborative work with trainers, teachers and sexual and reproductive health experts in Zambia. …

  11. Focus on youth: an HIV prevention program for African-American youth

    This is an HIV and sexually transmitted disease (STD) and teen pregnancy prevention programme targeting African-American youth between the ages of 12 and 15. First developed for recreation centres, it has been adapted to school settings. It is the updated version of the Focus on kids curriculum first developed in the 1990s. This curriculum has been thoroughly reviewed and evaluated and has been successfully exported to different cultural settings such as the Bahamas, China, Namibia and Viet Nam. …

Our mission

Supporting education ministries, researchers and practitioners through a comprehensive database, website and information service.