• Twitter
  • RSS

UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

Search resources

The search found 86 results in 0.019 seconds.

Search results

  1. The ABC's of HIV prevention: education in Uganda and Côte d'Ivoire

    Abstince-only education programs in the United States have been controversial since their inception in 1981 because of their lack of efficacy and because of the sexualities and behaviors that they promulgate. Barack Obama's 2010 budget eliminates federal funding for abstinence-only education programs in the US; however, the outline of his five-year strategy for the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) does not indicate whether the US government will continue to mandate abstinence-only education in so-called "focus countries", primarily in sub-Saharan Africa. …

  2. The impact of abstinence and comprehensive sex and STD/HIV education programs on adolescent sexual behavior

    In an effort to reduce unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted disease (STD) in adolescents, both abstinence and comprehensive sex and STD/HIV education programs have been proffered. Based on specified criteria, the author searched for and reviewed 56 studies that assessed the impact of such curricula (8 that evaluated 9 abstinence programs and 48 that evaluated comprehensive programs) on adolescents’ sexual behavior. Study results indicated that most abstinence programs did not delay initiation of sex and only 3 of 9 had any significant positive effects on any sexual behavior. …

  3. Ignorance Only - HIV/AIDS, Human rights and Federally funded Abstinence-only programs in the United States. Texas: A Case Study

    There is no vaccine to prevent HIV/AIDS, and the best treatment does not constitute a cure. U.S. government institutions responsible for setting public health standards have therefore repeatedly and strongly urged that providing complete and accurate information to adolescents about HIV/AIDS prevention, including the proper use of condoms as a means to reduce the risk of HIV transmission, be an important part of the government's prevention efforts. …

  4. Sexuality education approaches: what would be applicable to North of Africa and Middle East?

    In this paper, Middle East and North of Africa are not presented from demographic dimension, rather from cultural one, where the most dominant religion is is Islam. Consequently, the paper will discuss applicability of sex education approaches from Islamic perspectives but within the Middle East and North of Africa context.

  5. Do teenagers respond to HIV risk information? Evidence from a field experiment in Kenya

    We use a randomized experiment to test whether and what information changes teenagers' sexual behavior in Kenya. Providing information on the relative risk of HIV infection by partner's age led to a 28 percent decrease in teen pregnancy, an objective proxy for the incidence of unprotected sex. Self-reported sexual behavior data suggests substitution away from older (riskier) partners and toward same-age partners. In contrast, the official abstinence-only HIV curriculum had no impact on teen pregnancy. …

  6. School-Based Sexuality Education: The Issues and Challenges

    This article discusses the controversy and challenges that surrounded providing sex education in the U.S., including the Franklin Country (North Carolina) school board ordering the removal of textbook chapters dealing with sexual behavior, contraception, HIV/AIDs, and STIs from 9th graders health textbooks, and the state requirement to promote abstinence until marriage. It discusses the abstinence only movement and reviews efforts to undermine sexuality education dating back to the 1960s, while also providing the teachers' perspectives and difficulties faced. …

  7. Changing emphases in sexuality education in U.S. public secondary schools, 1988-1999

    This study analyzed data from a nationally representative survey of 3,754 7th-12th grade teachers of the subjects most often responsible for sexuality education. These results are compared to the subset of 1,767 teachers who actually taught sexuality education and another comparable survey from 1988. By 1999, 93% of respondents indicated that sexuality education was being taught in ther schools. This education covered STIs, abstinence, birth control, abortion and sexual orientation. …

  8. Sexuality Education in Fifth and Sixth Grades in U.S. Public Schools, 1999

    This study was conducted in 1999 using data from a nationally representative survey of 5th and 6th grader teachers (n=1789) in 5,543 public schools. Analyses were conducted of topics and skills taught relating to sexuality education, grades to which they were taught, teaching approaches, pressures experienced, support received and their needs. Seventy-two percent of the teachers reported that sexuality education is taught in their schools in at least one grade. …

  9. Sex Education and AIDS Education in the Schools: What States and Large School Districts Are Doing

    In the majority of states, sex education is mandatory or strongly recommended in public schools. Forty-eight states and most of the large school districts across the country support sex education, including about STIs and abstinence. Fewer districts and states make education on pregnancy prevention mandatory. Larger school districts cover a broader range of sex-related topics, especially related to preventing pregnancy, than state curricula. Such districts also provide greater support to instructors through curricula provision, training and other activities, than do states. …

  10. Sexually Active Adolescents have Less Knowledge and Less Fear of HIV than their Abstinent Peers

    A study in four districts of Rhode Island (USA) of 1,379 junior high school students (average age 13.2 years) found that sexually active boys were less knowledgeable about HIV, less tolerant of people living with AIDS, less fearful of contraction of HIV and more likely to undertake risky behavior, than those who were not sexually active. The same pattern, although less extreme, is found among girls in the sample. …

  11. HIV education in South African schools: the dilemma and conflicts of educators

    Educators within the school system are well placed to facilitate the dissemination of knowledge and skills in order for adolescents to be equipped for appropriate sexual decision-making. The aim of this research was to provide an understanding of educators' beliefs, attitudes and behaviours with regard to sexual and reproductive health promotion. Methods: Individual interviews were conducted with 15 educators from demographically diverse high schools in the Western Cape. One-off interviews were conducted with Grade 8 Life Orientation educators and principals. …

  12. Dating violence among school students in Tanzania and South Africa: prevalence and socio-demographic variations

    Aims: To identify with whom in-school adolescents preferred to communicate about sexuality, and to study adolescents' communication on HIV/AIDS, abstinence and condoms with parents/guardians, other adult family members, and teachers. Data were obtained from a baseline questionnaire survey carried out in South Africa (Cape Town and Mankweng) and Tanzania (Dar es Salaam) in early 2004. We analysed data for 14,944 adolescents from 80 randomly selected schools. …

  13. Sociodemographic variations in communication on sexuality and HIV/AIDS with parents, family members and teachers among in-school adolescents: a multi-site study in Tanzania and South Africa

    This paper aims to identify with whom in-school adolescents preferred to communicate about sexuality, and to study adolescents' communication on HIV/AIDS, abstinence and condoms with parents/guardians, other adult family members, and teachers. Data were obtained from a baseline questionnaire survey carried out in South Africa (Cape Town and Mankweng) and Tanzania (Dar es Salaam) in early 2004. We analysed data for 14,944 adolescents from 80 randomly selected schools. The mean ages were as follows: CapeTown, 13.38 years (standard deviation (SD). …

  14. Becoming a responsible teen adaptation kit. Tools and resources for making informed adaptations to BART: Becoming a responsible teen

    Although the primary goal of Becoming a Responsible Teen (BART) is to decrease HIV infection among African-American adolescents ages 14 to 18, the curriculum also includes topics and activities relevant to teen pregnancy prevention. Teens learn to clarify their own values about sexual decisions and pressures, as well as practice skills to reduce sexual risk taking. These skills include correct condom use, assertive communication, refusal techniques, self-management and problem solving. Abstinence is woven throughout the curriculum and is discussed as the best way to prevent HIV and pregnancy. …

  15. Draft HIV/AIDS policy for the education sector

    This policy document addresses all the sectors under the Ministry of Education such as Civil Servants, Teachers, learners, school committees, non-formal education institutions, special populations such as the disabled, the out of school youth as well as the orphaned and vulnerable children. This policy shall therefore be applicable to all government and private institutions in Swaziland. The aim of this policy is to guide all activities responding to the HIV/AIDS epidemic by the Ministry of Education. …

Pages

Our mission

Supporting education ministries, researchers and practitioners through a comprehensive database, website and information service.