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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Factors associated with HIV infection among educated Malawians: analysis of the 2010 demographic and health survey

    Introduction: Among people who have ever attended school, higher educational attainment appears to be associated with higher prevalence of HIV. This study assesses the association between education and HIV status in Malawi, among individuals with some education, after adjusting for various background characteristics.

  2. Predictors of knowledge about HIV/AIDS among young people: Lessons from Botswana

    This study sought to identify factors that can predict knowledge about HIV/AIDS among adolescents in Botswana. The data were collected through a self administered questionnaire from a sample of 1294 students from schools around the capital city of Botswana, Gaborone. The research instrument consisted of 76 items that solicited information on background characteristics of respondents, indicators of family cohesiveness and bonding of children with their parents, indicators of personal adjustment, evidence of sex life, and knowledge about HIV/AIDS. …

  3. The sexual behaviour of adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa: patterns and trends from national surveys

    Objectives: To describe the sexual and reproductive behaviour of adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa, particularly 15- to 19-year-olds. Methods: Using DHS/AIS data (2000–2010), nine indicators of adolescent behaviour and one of adult attitudes towards condom education for adolescents were described for 24 countries. Indicators were disaggregated by gender, urban/rural residency and educational status, and time trends were described. Results: Up to 25% of 15- to 19-year-olds reported sex before age 15; this proportion shrank over time in many countries. …

  4. Changes over time in sexual behaviour among young people with different levels of educational attainment in Tanzania

    HIV prevalence in Tanzania was initially higher among those with higher levels of educational attainment, but it has fallen fastest among these groups. Among those with lower levels of education, HIV prevalence has been stable. The authors analyzed data from two large, nationally representative surveys conducted in Tanzania in 2003/2004 and 2007/2008. They focused on young people ages 15 to 24 years and explored reports of (a) first sex, (b) having had more than one sexual partner in the last year and (c) unprotected last sex with a non-cohabiting partner. …

  5. Education and vulnerability: the role of schools in protecting young women and girls from HIV in southern Africa

    Education has a potentially important role to play in tackling the spread of HIV, but is there evidence that this potential is realized? This analysis combines the results of previous literature reviews and updates them with the findings of recent randomized controlled trials and a discussion of possible mechanisms for the effect of schooling on vulnerability to HIV infection. There is a growing body of evidence that keeping girls in school reduces their risk of contracting HIV. …

  6. Educational access and HIV prevention: Making the case for education as a health priority in sub-Saharan Africa

    There is much evidence showing an association between sexual behavior and both attendance and attainment. Experimental evidence that school attendance leads to safer sexual behavior is currently under review. Studies suggest several pathways through which sexual behavior, and consequently the risk of HIV infection, may be influenced by schooling. Students attending school have a smaller sexual network and a stronger motivation to avoid the consequences of unprotected sex - both pregnancy and HIV infection - than their out-of-school peers.

  7. Sexual behavior, pregnancy, and schooling among young people in urban South Africa

    This study is an article extracted from "Studies in Family Planning", special issue on Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health in Sub-Saharan Africa, published in December 2008. It examines transitions in schooling, sexual activity, and pregnancy among adolescents and young adults in urban South Africa. Data are analyzed from the Cape Area Panel Study (CAPS), a recently collected longitudinal survey of young adults and their families in metropolitan Cape Town. We find that teen pregnancy is not entirely inconsistent with continued schooling, especially for African women. …

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