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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Food for thought? Experimental evidence on the learning impacts of a large-scale school feeding program

    There is limited experimental evidence of the impact of large-scale, government-led school meals programs on educational achievements. The authors report results from a nationwide randomized trial of the Government of Ghana’s school feeding program. After two years, program availability led to moderate increases in test scores for the average pupil, and to remarkable learning and cognitive gains for girls, and children from the poorest households and regions. Increases in enrolment, attainment, and shifts in time spent at school constituted mechanisms for impact. …

  2. Food for thought? Experimental evidence on the learning impacts of a large-scale school feeding program in Ghana

    There is very limited experimental evidence of the impact of large-scale, government-led school meals programs on child educational achievements in Sub-Saharan Africa. The authors address this gap by reporting treatment effects from a nationwide randomized trial of the Government of Ghana’s school feeding program (GSFP) on children’s math and literacy, cognition (problem-solving ability and working memory), and composite scores of overall attainments. …

  3. Causal effects of education on sexual and reproductive health in low and middle-income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Despite strong theoretical grounding, important gaps in knowledge remain regarding the degree to which there is a causal relationship between education and sexual and reproductive health, as many claims have been made based on associations alone. Understanding the extent to which these relationships are causal is important both to inform investments in education and health, as well as to understand the mechanisms underlying these relationships. …

  4. Do both boys and girls feel safe at school – and does it matter?

    The relationship between feeling safe in school and academic achievement differs between boys and girls, and also varies between countries. Educational policymakers are advised to carefully analyze the complex interplay between gender, grade level and national contexts when developing strategies to enhance school safety.

  5. Optimizing education outcomes: high-return investments in school health for increased participation and learning

    The Disease Control Priorities (DCP) series established in 1993 shares this philosophy and acts as a key resource for Ministers of Health and Finance, guiding them toward informed decisions about investing in health. The third edition of DCP rightly recognizes that good health is but one facet of human development and that health and education outcomes are forever intertwined. The Commission report makes clear that more education equates with better health outcomes. …

  6. The effects of school-related gender-based violence on academic performance : evidence from Botswana, Ghana and South Africa

    School-Related Gender-Based Violence (SRGBV) is a global phenomenon that has the potential for serious and significant effects on students’ well-being and performance. It is based on and reinforces gendered stereotypes present in society and includes a variety of behaviors, such as sexual violence and harassment, corporal punishment, and bullying. The impact of school violence on students’ health and psychological development has been well documented. However, research on the consequences of school violence on academic achievement in different contexts was not addressed until recent times. …

  7. Global school health initiatives: achieving health and education outcomes

    The WHO School Health Technical Meeting was held in Bangkok on 23–25 November 2015 to consolidate what had been learned from regions and countries since the last WHO Technical Meeting on School Health in 2007 and to renew commitments and scale-up of the institutional capacity of the health and education sectors to achieve health and educational outcomes especially low-resource settings. More than 60 experts from a wide variety of geographical and professional backgrounds participated in the meeting. …

  8. Examination of substance use, risk factors, and protective factors on student academic test score performance

    School administrators and teachers face difficult decisions about how best to use school resources in order to meet academic achievement goals. Many are hesitant to adopt prevention curricula that are not focused directly on academic achievement. Yet, some have hypothesized that prevention curricula can remove barriers to learning and, thus, promote achievement. This study examined relationships between school levels of student substance use and risk and protective factors that predict adolescent problem behaviors and achievement test performance in Washington State.

  9. SABER School health and school feeding

    Even when quality schools, textbooks, and teachers are all provided, children can only receive effective education if they are in school and prepared to learn. Poor health and hunger both reduce attendance and hamper learning in school. School health and school feeding (SHSF) programs can help overcome these barriers to learning for all—especially among children and youth from poor households, who are most likely to suffer from health and nutrition problems. …

  10. School feeding and learning achievement: evidence from India’s Midday Meal Program

    We study the effect of the world’s largest school feeding program on children’s learning outcomes. Staggered implementation across different states of a 2001 Indian Supreme Court Directive mandating the introduction of free school lunches in public primary schools generates plausibly exogenous variation in program exposure across different birth cohorts. We exploit this to estimate the effect of program exposure on math and reading test scores of primary school-aged children. …

  11. The impact of teachers’ modifications of an evidenced-based HIV prevention intervention on program outcomes

    The degree to which evidence-based program outcomes are affected by modifications is a significant concern in the implementation of interventions. The ongoing national implementation of an evidence-based HIV prevention program targeting grade six students in The Bahamas [Focus on Youth in The Caribbean (FOYC)] offers an opportunity to explore factors associated with teachers’ modification of FOYC lessons and to examine the impact of types and degrees of modifications on student outcomes. Data were collected in 2012 from 155 teachers and 3646 students in 77 government elementary schools. …

  12. Menstruation as a barrier to education?

    Increasing education for girls is an important policy priority in many developing countries, where secondary school enrollment often remains lower for girls than for boys. Some researchers and policymakers have argued that menstruation may be causing girls to miss a significant number of school days. At the maximum, some have estimated that girls might be missing as much as 10 to 20 percent of school days due to menstruation. Anecdotal evidence seems to support this. Girls report missing school during their periods and lacking access to modern sanitary products. …

  13. Health promoting schools impact on targeted student outcomes: analysis report

    Health Promoting Schools (or HPS) is a school community focused national service funded by the Ministry of Health in New Zealand to help schools assess and address the health and wellbeing requirements of their students to advance student learning and achievement outcomes. This report assesses how successful the Health Promoting Schools service has been across schools in New Zealand.

  14. Bullying, identity and school performance: evidence from Chile

    This article examines the relationship among bullying, individual’s identity, and school performance in Chile. The results indicate that being a bully or a bully-victim increases the probability of being a low performing student. For the case of victims, our results suggest a heterogeneity according students’ ability, decreasing academic achievement for students with below average ability, but increasing it for very high achieving students. We also found that students claiming to belong to a subculture characterized by a defiant attitude towards authority have lower academic achievement. …

  15. Health barriers to learning: the prevalence and educational consequences in disadvantaged children: a review of the literature

    This report describes the Health Barriers to Learning and the supporting evidence base for their impact on academic success. It also describes the disproportionate prevalence of HBLs in disadvantaged children, the extent of unmet need for services for identification, management and treatment, and each HBL’s impact on learning. Screening and management for each of these should be essential to supporting school and learning readiness. …

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