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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. To flush or not to flush: Monitoring and evaluating the primary school sanitary facilities against Ministries' benchmark standards in Southern and Eastern African countries

    Sustainable access to basic sanitation in school is well featured in the Education for All (EFA) goals and Millennium Development Goal (MDG). The United Nations General Assembly of 2010 declared access to sanitation as a human right (United Nations, 2010) in association with the MDG #7, with a particular target to “halve the proportion of people without sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation” by 2015

  2. The role of partners’ educational attainment in the association between HIV and education amongst women in seven sub-Saharan African countries

    Introduction: Individuals’ educational attainment has long been considered as a risk factor for HIV. However, little attention has been paid to the association between partner educational attainment and HIV infection. Methods: We conducted cross-sectional analysis of young women (aged 1534) in 14 Demographic and Health Surveys from seven sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) countries with generalized HIV epidemics. …

  3. Assessing school climate towards sustainable learning for all in Sub-Saharan Africa: Perspectives from unstable health to school-related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

    The objective of the current study is to explore the use of Rasch scaling technique to construct a Perceived School Disorder Index (PSDI) in order to see if there are ‘stages’ of evolution in a school climate. More specifically, the research questions for the current study are: Which items constitute the PSDI in Sub-Saharan African countries? What profile of behavioural problems are likely to emerge at different stages of the school climate? What were boys’ and girls’ learning outcomes at each stage of the school climate?

  4. Violence in primary schools in Southern and Eastern Africa: Some evidence from SACMEQ

    Special attention was given to the issues related to school violence in the studies conducted by a consortium known as Southern and Eastern Africa Consortium for Monitoring Educational Quality (SACMEQ). These issues were included in the form of research questions which sought information on pupils’ and teachers’ behavioural problems at the primary school level. This paper addresses the following three research questions: (1) What were the changes in the perceived occurrence of school violence in SACMEQ school systems between 2000 and 2007? …

  5. HIV and AIDS. Its impact on education and an analysis of the implementation of the Kenyan education sector policy on HIV and AIDS

    The aim of this study, undertaken at the request of the Kenyan Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MoEST), was to describe and analyse the impact of HIV and AIDS on the education sector in Kenya, and provide a situational analysis of the implementation of the Kenyan Education Sector Policy on HIV and AIDS (2004). It aimed to provide empirical evidence on how HIV and AIDS have affected the education sector in Kenya, and to identify gaps in research and programme interventions. …

  6. The impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on the attainment of basic education in Kenya

    We invesitigated the impact of HIV/AIDS on athe attainment of basic education in Kenya. The following policy-related questions were addressed: What are the impacts of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on education-performance indicators (e.g. rates of enrollment, dropping out, absenteeism, grade-level/course repetition, and transition) in primary and secondary schools? Does HIV/AIDS affect teacher attrition (retirements, deaths, illness, and absenteeism) in Kenya? What policies and strategies has the government implemented in the education sector to combat the HIV/AIDS epidemic? …

  7. The effect of HIV/AIDS on educational attainment

    Using data from Demographic and Health Surveys for eleven countries in sub-Saharan Africa,the authorestimates the effect of local HIV prevalence on individual human capital investment. The authorfinds that the HIV/AIDS epidemic has reduced human capital investment: living in an area with higher HIV prevalence is associated with lower levels of completed schooling and slower progress through school. These results are consistent with a model of human capital investment in which parents and children respond to changes in the expected return to schooling driven by mortality risk.

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