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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Rising school enrollment and declining HIV and pregnancy risk among adolescents in Rakai district, Uganda, 1994–2013

    Background: Poverty, family stability, and social policies influence the ability of adolescents to attend school. Likewise, being enrolled in school may shape an adolescent’s risk for HIV and pregnancy. We identified trends in school enrollment, factors predicting school enrollment (antecedents), and health risks associated with staying in or leaving school (consequences). Methods: Data from the Rakai Community Cohort Study (RCCS) were examined for adolescents 15–19 years (n = 21,735 person-rounds) from 1994 to 2013. …

  2. Length of secondary schooling and risk of HIV infection in Botswana: evidence from a natural experiment

    Background An estimated 2.1 million individuals are newly infected with HIV every year. Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have reported conflicting evidence for the association between education and HIV risk, and no randomised trial has identified a causal effect for education on HIV incidence. We aimed to use a policy reform in secondary schooling in Botswana to identify the causal effect of length of schooling on new HIV infection. …

  3. The government of Kenya cash transfer for orphaned and vulnerable children: cross-sectional comparison of household and individual characteristics of those with and without

    Background: The ‘Cash Transfer to Orphans and Vulnerable Children’ (CT-OVC) in Kenya is a government-supported program intended to provide regular and predictable cash transfers (CT) to poor households taking care of OVC. CT programs can be an effective means of alleviating poverty and facilitating the attainment of an adequate standard of living for people’s health and well-being and other international human rights. …

  4. Education sector policy for orphans and vulnerable children

    The goal of this policy is to ensure that an increased number of OVC are able to access, remain in, and complete general education of good quality. The objective of this policy is to ensure that all OVC of school-going age attend school and are not deterred from full participation through lack of financial means, material or psychosocial need, stigma, discrimination or any other constraints, and to ensure that out-of school OVC are brought back into school or provided with appropriate alternative educational opportunities.

  5. HIV and AIDS. Its impact on education and an analysis of the implementation of the Kenyan education sector policy on HIV and AIDS

    The aim of this study, undertaken at the request of the Kenyan Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MoEST), was to describe and analyse the impact of HIV and AIDS on the education sector in Kenya, and provide a situational analysis of the implementation of the Kenyan Education Sector Policy on HIV and AIDS (2004). It aimed to provide empirical evidence on how HIV and AIDS have affected the education sector in Kenya, and to identify gaps in research and programme interventions. …

  6. The impact of HIV on children's education in eastern Zimbabwe

    Little is known about how HIV impacts directly and indirectly on receiving, or particularly succeeding in, education in sub-Saharan Africa. To address this gap, we used multivariable logistic regression to determine the correlation between education outcomes in youth (aged 15–24) (being in the correct grade-for-age, primary school completion and having at least five “O” level passes) and being HIV-positive; having an HIV-positive parent; being a young carer; or being a maternal, paternal or double orphan, in five rounds (1998–2011) of a general population survey from eastern Zimbabwe. …

  7. A Review of education policy to address the active and passive exclusion of learners affected by HIV and AIDS from attending or participating in schooling

    The study focuses on four key barriers to education, which are most prominent for children affected by HIV and AIDS, namely: HIV/AIDS-related illness of learners; Grief and trauma associated with illness and death of family/household members; Increased domestic responsibility (and exploitation through child labour) for children affected by AIDS; HIV- and AIDS-related stigma and discrimination.

  8. Education and vulnerability: the role of schools in protecting young women and girls from HIV in southern Africa

    Education has a potentially important role to play in tackling the spread of HIV, but is there evidence that this potential is realized? This analysis combines the results of previous literature reviews and updates them with the findings of recent randomized controlled trials and a discussion of possible mechanisms for the effect of schooling on vulnerability to HIV infection. There is a growing body of evidence that keeping girls in school reduces their risk of contracting HIV. …

  9. The association between school attendance, HIV infection and sexual behaviour among young people in rural South Africa

    Objectives: To investigate whether the prevalence of HIV infection among young people, and sexual behaviours associated with increased HIV risk, are differentially distributed between students and those not attending school or college. Design: A random population sample of unmarried young people (916 males, 1003 females) aged 14–25 years from rural South Africa in 2001. Methods: Data on school attendance and HIV risk characteristics came from structured face-to-face interviews. HIV serostatus was assessed by oral fluid ELISA. …

  10. Systematic review exploring time trends in the association between educational attainment and risk of HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa

    Objective: To assess the evidence that the association between educational attainment and risk of HIV infection is changing over time in sub-Saharan Africa. Design and methods: Systematic review of published peer-reviewed articles. Articles were identified that reported original data comparing individually measured educational attainment and HIV status among at least 300 individuals representative of the general population of countries or regions of sub-Saharan Africa. …

  11. Children’s school participation and HIV/AIDS in rural Malawi: the role of parental knowledge and perceptions

    Studies of the relationship between HIV/AIDS and children’s educational attainment largely focus on the direct impacts of parental illness and death, overlooking the potential indirect impact that parental knowledge and perceptions of their HIV status may have on children’s school enrollment. Drawing on both quantitative and qualitative evidence from Malawi, this paper finds that women’s real and perceived anticipation of future health shocks has a positive impact on their children’s educational attainment. …

  12. Zimbabwe national strategic plan for the education of girls, orphans and other vulnerable children 2005-2010

    Guided by the overall principles of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, the Zimbabwean education act, the national policy on gender, the Orphan Care Policy and National Plan of Action for Orphans and Other Vulnerable Children, the proposed five year National Girls' Education strategic plan aims to accelerate Zimbabwe's progress towards UPE in the context of gender and other social asymmetries in accessing education. …

  13. Orphanhood and completion of compulsory school education among young people in South Africa: findings from a national representative survey

    We examined the association of orphanhood and completion of compulsory school education among young people in South Africa. In South Africa, school attendance is compulsory through grade 9, which should be completed before age 16. However, family and social factors such as orphanhood and poverty can hinder educational attainment. Participants were 10,452 16-24-year-olds who completed a South African national representative household survey. Overall, 23% had not completed compulsory school levels. …

  14. Understanding the impact of HIV/AIDS on education in sub-Saharan Africa: Kenya. Country report

    The purpose of the study is to improve our understanding of the current impact of HIV and AIDS on primary education in four Eastern and Southem African countries. The study uses Kelly's (2000) framework which identifies potential ways in which education systems are affected by HIV and AIDS. Using a selection of his categories the study is designed to assess the impact at both national and local levels through the collection of empirical data on the teaching force and the situation of orphans in each country. …

  15. Malawi and the fight against HIV/AIDS

    Despite the potentially extremely serious impacts of HIV/AIDS on education in Malawi, very little attention had been devoted to this fundamentally important problem. No robust research had been undertaken that systematically analyses all key quantitative and qualitative impacts of the epidemics on education. The study focused on three key questions: A) How has the HIV/AIDS epidemic affected primary and secondary schooling? B) What would be the likely impacts of the epidemic on education provision during the next 10-15 years? C) What should be done to mitigate these impacts?

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