• Twitter
  • RSS

UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

Search resources

The search found 15 results in 0.02 seconds.

Search results

  1. Adolescent motherhood and secondary schooling in Chile

    The authors analyze the determinants of adolescent motherhood and its subsequent effect on high school attendance and completion in Chile. Using eight rounds of household surveys, they find that adolescents who were born to teen mothers, those that live in poor households and in single-mother families, are more likely to have children, while access to full-time high schools reduces the likelihood of motherhood. They then estimate the effect of adolescent motherhood on the probability of high school attendance and completion. …

  2. Because I am a girl: The state of the world's girls 2014. Pathways to power: Creating sustainable change for adolescent girls

    This is the eighth in the annual ‘Because I am a Girl’ report series, published by Plan, which assesses the current state of the world’s girls. While women and children are recognised in policy and planning, girls’ needs and rights are often ignored. The reports provide evidence, including the voices of girls themselves, as to why they need to be treated differently from boys and adult women. They also use information from primary research, in particular a small study set up in 2006 following 142 girls from nine countries. …

  3. Intervention and results of combating school-related gender-based violence in Democratic Republic of Congo

    This powerpoint presents the outcome of a project which aimed to promote positive social and gender norms to prevent and mitigate SRGBV in Katanga Province, DRC. …

  4. Ending school related gender violence in Nsanje district, Malawi: baseline study

    Concern Worldwide has initiated a project called Ending School Related Gender-Based Violence in Malawi to run from 2012 to 2015. The goal of the new program is that the right of girls to access quality primary education, free from all forms of violence and discrimination, be actively promoted by schools, communities and the State in Nsanje District. The expected outcomes of the program are: 1. A safe learning environment for girls is ensured in 17 primary schools in Nsanje; 2. …

  5. The cost and cost-effectiveness of gender-responsive interventions for HIV: a systematic review

    Introduction: Harmful gender norms and inequalities, including gender-based violence, are important structural barriers to effective HIV programming. We assess current evidence on what forms of gender-responsive intervention may enhance the effectiveness of basic HIV programmes and be cost-effective. Methods: Effective intervention models were identified from an existing evidence review (“what works for women”). Based on this, we conducted a systematic review of published and grey literature on the costs and cost-effectiveness of each intervention identified. …

  6. Teenage, married and out of school. Effects of early marriage and childbirth on school dropout

    In this paper, we tackle the question of causality between early marriage and school dropout, using data from the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) from nine Southern and Eastern African countries. By comparing school participation patterns of girls who were married before or during the school year in question to those were never married, we are able to establish a sequence of events and therefore, a more solid foundation for treating marriage as a cause of school dropout. In short, the first research question for this paper is as follows: Research Question 1. …

  7. Programs to address child marriage: Framing the problem

    Child marriage violates girls’ human rights and adversely affects their health and well-being. While age at marriage is increasing in most regions of the developing world, early marriage persists for large populations. Worldwide, it is estimated that more than one out of three women aged 20–24 were married before age 18, and one out of seven were married before age 15. There is great variation in child marriage practices across and within regions and between ethnic and religious groups. Eradicating child marriage has long been on the agenda of the United Nations and of individual countries. …

  8. Girls' education, empowerment, and transitions to adulthood: The case for a shared agenda

    Education is essential to prepare adolescent girls for healthy, safe and productive transitions to adulthood. However, adolescent girls in much of the developing world are underserved by the education sector – too many are not in school, or are not receiving a quality, relevant education in a safe and supportive environment. At the same time, programs that emphasize girls’ healthy and productive transitions to adulthood are not adequately linking with the education sector. …

  9. Girls Speak: A New Voice in Global Development

    Girls Speak: A New Voice in Global Development is part of a series of reports on investing in adolescent girls in the developing world. This report examines qualitative data on what girls say about their aspirations across different settings and contexts. From a girl's perspective, policies and programs need to address the harmful social norms that constrain her role and opportunities in society, and provide a greater vision for her life. In their own words, girls are saying that the context and environment that shapes their lives - how they live and what they aspire to - must be addressed. …

  10. Promoting gender equality in education. Gender in Education Network in Asia-Pacific (GENIA) Toolkit

    The GENIA Toolkit is a collection of resources for use by gender focal points and education planners and implementers to promote gender equality and mainstream gender in the education system. This fourth revised version of the toolkit (originally designed in 2003 when the Gender in Education Network in Asia (GENIA) was set up) is the output of the recent process of updating. …

  11. Walking the talk: putting women's rights at the heart of the HIV and AIDS response

    Using research from 13 countries, this report demonstrates that gender inequalities and the persistent and systematic violation of their rights are leaving women and girls disproportionately vulnerable to HIV and AIDS. Poverty and limited access to education and information, discriminatory laws and ingrained gender inequalities all deny women and girls their rights. …

  12. Stop violence against girls in school

    Violence is a major barrier to education for millions of girls across the globe. The prevalence of violence against girls affects both their rights to education and their rights in education, and is the focus of a new ActionAid International advocacy initiative. The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), including Goal 2 (universal primary education) and Goal 3 (gender equality), make no explicit mention of violence against girls as a critical structural barrier to education (UN 2000). …

  13. Keeping the promise: five benefits of girls' secondary education

    Countries around the world have achieved huge gains in primary education, reaching a world average of 83.8 percent in net primary enrollment. However, large numbers of students still do not complete primary education, and even fewer continue on to secondary school. Since so few children complete primary school, those who do must be able to continue their schooling. It is the only way for students and society to reap the full benefits of their initial investment in a literate, educated population. …

  14. Gender achievements and prospects in education. The GAP Report: part one

    On 1 January 2006, the world will wake up to a deadline missed. The Millennium Development Goal - gender parity in primary and secondary education by 2005 - will remain unmet. What is particularly disheartening is that this was a realistic deadline and a reachable goal. The tragedy of this failure is that an unthinkable number of children, the majority of whom are girls, have been abandoned to a bleak future.The GAP report, a multimedia project, is more than a wake-up call. …

  15. Educate girls fight AIDS

    Growing evidence shows that getting and keeping young people in school, particularly girls, dramatically lowers their vulnerability to HIV. By itself, merely attending primary school makes young people significantly less likely to contract HIV. When young people stay in school through the secondary level, education's protective effect against HIV is even more pronounced. …

Our mission

Supporting education ministries, researchers and practitioners through a comprehensive database, website and information service.