• Twitter
  • RSS

UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

Search resources

The search found 9 results in 0.02 seconds.

Search results

  1. Rising school enrollment and declining HIV and pregnancy risk among adolescents in Rakai district, Uganda, 1994–2013

    Background: Poverty, family stability, and social policies influence the ability of adolescents to attend school. Likewise, being enrolled in school may shape an adolescent’s risk for HIV and pregnancy. We identified trends in school enrollment, factors predicting school enrollment (antecedents), and health risks associated with staying in or leaving school (consequences). Methods: Data from the Rakai Community Cohort Study (RCCS) were examined for adolescents 15–19 years (n = 21,735 person-rounds) from 1994 to 2013. …

  2. Orphanhood and completion of compulsory school education among young people in South Africa: findings from a national representative survey

    We examined the association of orphanhood and completion of compulsory school education among young people in South Africa. In South Africa, school attendance is compulsory through grade 9, which should be completed before age 16. However, family and social factors such as orphanhood and poverty can hinder educational attainment. Participants were 10,452 16-24-year-olds who completed a South African national representative household survey. Overall, 23% had not completed compulsory school levels. …

  3. Poverty, AIDS and children's schooling: a targeting dilemma

    This paper analyzes the relationship between orphan status, household wealth, and child school enrollment using data collected in the 1990s from 28 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean, with one country in Southeast Asia. The findings point to considerable diversity - so much so that generalizations are not possible. While there are some examples of large differentials in enrollment by orphan status, in the majority of cases the orphan enrollment gap is dwarfed by the gap between children from richer and poorer households. …

  4. Girls Speak: A New Voice in Global Development

    Girls Speak: A New Voice in Global Development is part of a series of reports on investing in adolescent girls in the developing world. This report examines qualitative data on what girls say about their aspirations across different settings and contexts. From a girl's perspective, policies and programs need to address the harmful social norms that constrain her role and opportunities in society, and provide a greater vision for her life. In their own words, girls are saying that the context and environment that shapes their lives - how they live and what they aspire to - must be addressed. …

  5. Step by step: a guide to HIV and AIDS policy development for the education sector. Caribbean Education Sector HIV and AIDS Capacity Building Programme

    This toolkit was developed to guide Ministries of Education, particularly in the Caribbean region, through the rapid policy development process towards a specific outcome: an effective HIV and AIDS policy for the education sector that is linked with an achievable implementation plan. The toolkit follows a clear four-step process: Step 1: Planning for policy development; Step 2: Developing the policy; Step 3: Implementing the policy; Step 4: Monitoring and evaluating the policy. …

  6. Young children and HIV/AIDS: Mapping the field

    This paper offers a concise and comprehensive overview of the literature from a psychological perspective. It explores a range of issues in emotional, psychological, social and physical development, and their relation to broader issues including poverty, nutrition and human rights. It identifies gaps in knowledge and will help funders, policy makers and practitioners to locate their own work in the bigger picture.

  7. Learning to survive: how education for all would save millions of young people from HIV/AIDS

    Universal primary education (UPE) could save at least 7 million young people from contracting HIV over a decade. However, without dramatic increases in aid to education, Africa will not be able to get every child into school for another 150 years. This report sets out why UPE is crucial to halting the spread of HIV/AIDS, and outlines what both rich and poor countries need to do now to enable millions of children to learn ... to survive.

  8. Keeping the promise: five benefits of girls' secondary education

    Countries around the world have achieved huge gains in primary education, reaching a world average of 83.8 percent in net primary enrollment. However, large numbers of students still do not complete primary education, and even fewer continue on to secondary school. Since so few children complete primary school, those who do must be able to continue their schooling. It is the only way for students and society to reap the full benefits of their initial investment in a literate, educated population. …

  9. Educate girls fight AIDS

    Growing evidence shows that getting and keeping young people in school, particularly girls, dramatically lowers their vulnerability to HIV. By itself, merely attending primary school makes young people significantly less likely to contract HIV. When young people stay in school through the secondary level, education's protective effect against HIV is even more pronounced. …

Our mission

Supporting education ministries, researchers and practitioners through a comprehensive database, website and information service.