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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Education sector policy for the prevention and management of learner pregnancy

    The goal of this policy is to improve the prevention and management of learner pregnancy in Namibia, with the ultimate aim of decreasing the number of learner pregnancies and increasing the number of learner-parents who complete their education. Education is both a human right in itself and an indispensable means of realising other human rights. In order to meet Vision 2030, it is essential that a policy is put in place to address learner pregnancy that will make a real and sustainable difference in the lives of children and their children. …

  2. Books and babies. Pregnancy and young parents in schools

    Being pregnant and a young parent in South African schools is not easy. Books and Babies examines why this is the case. Drawing on both quantitative and qualitative research conducted in secondary schools in Durban and Cape Town, the book explores how teachers and principals respond to the presence of pregnant learners and young parents in school, and surveys the attitudes of fellow learners towards them. …

  3. Children’s school participation and HIV/AIDS in rural Malawi: the role of parental knowledge and perceptions

    Studies of the relationship between HIV/AIDS and children’s educational attainment largely focus on the direct impacts of parental illness and death, overlooking the potential indirect impact that parental knowledge and perceptions of their HIV status may have on children’s school enrollment. Drawing on both quantitative and qualitative evidence from Malawi, this paper finds that women’s real and perceived anticipation of future health shocks has a positive impact on their children’s educational attainment. …

  4. Education and nutritional status of orphans and children of HIV-infected parents in Kenya

    We examine how school attendance and nutritional status differ between orphaned and fostered children, and between children of HIV-infected parents and non-HIV-infected parents in Kenya. Our analysis is based on information on 2,756 children age 0-4 years and 4,172 children age 6-14 years included in the male subsample of the 2003 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey (DHS). …

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