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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Rising school enrollment and declining HIV and pregnancy risk among adolescents in Rakai district, Uganda, 1994–2013

    Background: Poverty, family stability, and social policies influence the ability of adolescents to attend school. Likewise, being enrolled in school may shape an adolescent’s risk for HIV and pregnancy. We identified trends in school enrollment, factors predicting school enrollment (antecedents), and health risks associated with staying in or leaving school (consequences). Methods: Data from the Rakai Community Cohort Study (RCCS) were examined for adolescents 15–19 years (n = 21,735 person-rounds) from 1994 to 2013. …

  2. The effect of educational attainment and other factors on HIV risk in South African women: results from antenatal surveillance, 2000-2005

    Objectives: To assess the effect of educational attainment and other factors on the risk of HIV in pregnant South African women. Design: Repeated cross-sectional surveys. Methods: Pregnant women attending public antenatal clinics were tested for HIV annually between 2000 and 2005, and provided demographic information. Logistic regression models were applied separately to the data collected in each year, to identify factors associated with HIV infection. Data from all years were combined in a logistic regression model that tested for trends in HIV prevalence. …

  3. Educational access and HIV prevention: Making the case for education as a health priority in sub-Saharan Africa

    There is much evidence showing an association between sexual behavior and both attendance and attainment. Experimental evidence that school attendance leads to safer sexual behavior is currently under review. Studies suggest several pathways through which sexual behavior, and consequently the risk of HIV infection, may be influenced by schooling. Students attending school have a smaller sexual network and a stronger motivation to avoid the consequences of unprotected sex - both pregnancy and HIV infection - than their out-of-school peers.

  4. Factors influencing access and retention in primary schooling for children and young people affected by HIV and AIDS: Case studies from rural Malawi

    This report presents findings from the second phase of the SOFIE research project. The research focuses on young people affected by HIV and AIDS and aims to improve their access to learning and increase retention through the use of ODFL strategies that complement and enrich conventional schooling.

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