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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. The impact of homophobic and transphobic bullying on education and employment

    In February 2013, the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer Youth and Student Organisation (IGLYO) commissioned Eleanor Formby from Sheffield Hallam University (in the UK) to carry out research on the impact of homophobic and transphobic bullying on education and employment in Europe. An online survey used, specifically targeted at a range of countries: Croatia, Denmark, Ireland, Italy, and Poland. The research extends existing literature that often focuses on impacts on mental health and emotional wellbeing. …

  2. National strategy for care and support services in primary schools in Tanzania

    Education is one of the basic child rights and it is vital for children’s future life. Children should attend school and take full advantage of getting their right for education. The Millennium development Goal 2 is to achieve Primary Education of good quality by the year 2015. The Dakar Framework for Action adapted in the World Education Forum reaffirmed the Global commitment to EFA exists six major goals focused on providing Gender responsive good and quality education to all children and adults. …

  3. Recomendación general no. 8/2004. Sobre el caso de la discriminación en las escuelas a menores portadores de VIH o que padecen SIDA

    Recomendación general de la Comisión Nacional de los Derechos Humanos de México respecto a casos de discriminación en las escuelas hacia niños que viven con VIH.

  4. Factors influencing access and retention in secondary schooling for orphaned and vulnerable children and young people: case studies from high HIV and AIDS prevalence contexts in Lesotho

    The aim of this study was to identify factors influencing access and retention in secondary schooling for orphans and other vulnerable children living in high HIV prevalence areas of Lesotho. A case study approach was used to address this aim. The findings from this study have been used to inform an intervention that seeks to increase access to learning and thereby reduce drop-out and repetition rates in secondary schools. This study and the intervention are part of a larger programme of research known as the SOFIE Project (see http://sofie.ioe.ac.uk). …

  5. Saving children, enhancing lives: combating HIV and AIDS in South Africa

    The document provides a succinct overview of the burden and impact of HIV and AIDS in South African children and reviews the progress made in preventing HIV and mitigating its impacts on children and affected families. It lays out the bottlenecks for wide scale delivery of services and outlines UNICEF priority actions to support scaling up evidence-based high impact interventions that could help South Africa attain its Vision 2014 of turning the tide against HIV.

  6. Letting them fail: Government neglect and the right to education for children affected by AIDS

    Governments in sub-Saharan Africa have failed to address the extraordinary barriers to education faced by children who are orphaned or otherwise affected by HIV/AIDS. An estimated 43 million school-age children do not attend school in the region. HIV/AIDS has caused unprecedented rates of adult mortality, leaving millions of children without parental care to ensure their access to education. …

  7. HIV in schools: Good practice guide to supporting children infected or affected by HIV

    This guide provides schools and local education authorities (LEAs) with practical information and suggestions on ways of supporting children and young people living with HIV. It addresses schools' concerns about HIV and sets out some simple ways in which a school can provide a supportive environment for infected and affected children. …

  8. Contrasting Primary School Outcomes of Paternal and Maternal Orphans in Manicaland, Zimbabwe

    Fewer orphans are enrolled in school than other children but the extent of disadvantage-after allowing for their older average age- is small in most countries. Crosscountry analyses show variation in the size and strength of associations between orphanhood and education according to the form of parental loss experienced. However, maternal death is usually more detrimental to children's education chances than paternal death and double orphans are typically the least likely to be in school. These differences are not fully accounted for by differences in household socio-economic circumstances. …

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