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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Life Doesn’t Wait. Romania’s Failure to Protect and Support Children and Youth Living with HIV

    More than 7,200 Romanian children and youth age fifteen to nineteen are living with HIV—the largest such group in any European country. The vast majority were infected with HIV between 1986 and 1991 as a direct result of government policies that exposed them to contaminated needles and “microtransfusions” of unscreened blood. Despite Romania’s progressive expansion of access to antiretroviral drugs, these children and youth face pervasive stigma and discrimination that often impedes their enjoyment of basic rights and services. …

  2. National strategy for care and support services in primary schools in Tanzania

    Education is one of the basic child rights and it is vital for children’s future life. Children should attend school and take full advantage of getting their right for education. The Millennium development Goal 2 is to achieve Primary Education of good quality by the year 2015. The Dakar Framework for Action adapted in the World Education Forum reaffirmed the Global commitment to EFA exists six major goals focused on providing Gender responsive good and quality education to all children and adults. …

  3. Looking within: creating community safety nets for vulnerable youth in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania

    This case study describes the work of a program implemented by Youth Alive Tanzania, a faith-based organization in Dar-es-Salaam, which created The Youth and Parents Crisis Counseling Center (YOPAC) in 1999. YOPAC was established by Youth Alive with the specific aim of helping children and youth protect their access to education, including primary and secondary education, as well as vocational training. YOPAC's other activities include home-based care, HIV testing and counseling, psychosocial care and support, education, and outreach programming. …

  4. Education of children with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    Treatment for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has enabled more children and youths to attend school and participate in school activities. Children and youths with HIV infection should receive the same education as those with other chronic illnesses. They may require special services, including home instruction, to provide continuity of education. Confidentiality about HIV infection status should be maintained with parental consent required for disclosure. Youths also should assent or consent as is appropriate for disclosure of their diagnosis.

  5. The social and economic impact of HIV/AIDS on families with adolescents and children in Cambodia

    Cambodia is among the countries most severely affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Asia. In 2003, an estimated 123,100 adults in Cambodia were living with HIV/AIDS and 60,000 children were affected by HIV/AIDS. In responding to the epidemic, donors, policymakers, and program planners have had little country-specific information regarding the impact of HIV/AIDS and the effectiveness of interventions, impeding their ability to make decisions regarding resource allocation and program design. …

  6. Responding to the education needs of children and adolescents affected by AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa. Report on Town Hall Meeting, October 23, 2001

    On October 23, 2001, more than 100 people gathered at Peace Corps headquarters in Washington, D.C., for the third in a series of Town Hall Meetings to address the needs of orphans and vulnerable children in developing countries. The meeting focused on the challenge of educating children and adolescents affected by AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa. By bringing together participants from a wide range of groups, including from both the education and health sectors, organizers hoped to stimulate a useful exchange of information. …

  7. HIV/AIDS and young people: hope for tomorrow

    This booklet examines the impact of HIV/AIDS on young people, looking at why they are being hit by the epidemic. It puts forward some ideas for HIV/AIDS prevention education and lists some principles for working with young people.

  8. Adolescents: orphaned and vulnerable in the time of HIV/AIDS

    This paper first introduces the key issues regarding orphaned and vulnerable adolescents in the time of HIV/AIDS, including the developmental needs specific to adolescents. The second chapter summarizes the limited studies and programs working primarily with adolescents orphaned due to AIDS. Following are four case studies that demonstrate different strategies for working with adolescent orphans and other youth vulnerable to HIV/AIDS, reflecting different cultural and programmatic approaches relevant to Africa, Asia, and Eastern Europe. …

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