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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Forced out: mandatory pregnancy testing and the expulsion of pregnant students in Tanzanian schools

    This publication documents the forced pregnancy testing and expulsion of pregnant school girls in mainland Tanzania. Launched in 2013 and based on in-depth interviews with young women who have undergone these practices, as well as teachers, government officials, and health care providers, this report provides concrete evidence and compelling stories of the numerous human rights violations many Tanzanian girls face in the pursuit of education. In addition, the report provides key recommendations to the Tanzanian Government, regional human rights bodies, and the international donor community. …

  2. Perceptions of policy duty bearers on the inclusive education policy for pregnant teenagers in South Africa

    Post-apartheid, South Africa democratised access to education as enshrined in the country’s Constitutional Bill of Rights of 1996. This also includes making education accessible to pregnant teenagers as provided for by other post-apartheid legal provisions that prohibit discrimination in education. This study explored the perceptions of education policy duty bearers on the inclusion of pregnant learners in formal schools. …

  3. Unintended pregnancy and termination of studies among students in Anambra state, Nigeria: are secondary schools playing their part?

    This study evaluated efforts of secondary schools to prevent unintended pregnancy among students and their reactions to pregnant students before and after delivery. A cross-sectional survey of 46 teachers in three public and two private schools in Anambra state, Nigeria was carried out. Information was collected using self-administered questionnaire. Of all the teachers in the study, 87% reported unintended pregnancies among students in the previous 3 years. Expulsion (43%) and suspension (28%) were the most common reactions. …

  4. Exploring experiences of pregnant and mothering secondary school students in Tanzania

    The Constitution of Tanzania grants every child the right to education, yet a girl’s access to education is denied when she becomes pregnant or gives birth. This study explored the experiences of pregnant and mothering students in secondary schools and the community awareness, attitudes and perceptions toward pregnancy policy in Tanzania. It sought insights into parenting students’ challenges, coping strategies, and their suggestions on how to help teen mothers who are returning to school. …

  5. Measures for the prevention and management of learner pregnancy. Choose to wait for a brighter future

    This document aims to clarify the position of the department of Education regarding learner pregnancies. The measures provide a framework for: educating and assisting learners to understand and exercise their rights and responsibilities in regard to healthy lifestyles; guiding and supporting vulnerable learners; and involving all relevant role-players, and integrating these measures with available systems and structures.

  6. Inclusion or exclusion ramifications of teenage pregnancy: a comparative analysis of Namibia and South African schools pregnancy policies

    Pregnancy of learners for most South African schools has reached alarming proportions. To most governing bodies and teachers, it has becomes difficult to deal with pregnancy of learners. What makes this a conundrum is that teachers don’t know what should be done for the well-being of the pregnant leaner, the baby and the fear that learners and teachers who may have to provide medical help should medical problems arise are not prepared. South African constitution forbids excluding pregnant learners from school and allows them (Pregnant learners) to continue with their schooling. …

  7. An assessment of the implementation of the re-entry policy for girls in Swaziland: school practices and implications for policy development

    Swaziland has no stand-alone re-entry policy. Practices vary from school to school, but generally a pregnant adolescent girl has to drop out of school although those who become pregnant may be allowed to return to write their exams at the same school or they may be advised to find another examination centre. …

  8. FAWE Zambia’s campaign for an enabling readmission policy for adolescent mothers

    This booklet traces the evolution of the re-entry policy in Zambia and emphasizes the seriousness of having in place clear guidelines and a tracking and monitoring system for its implementation. While many countries now recognize the importance of giving adolescent mothers a second chance to continue with their education and pave a future for themselves, only a handful have re-entry policies in place. And among those who have, many have failed to systematically monitor the impact of the policy. …

  9. Communication strategy: on the impact of HIV and AIDS on the prospects of attainment of other Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in Zambia, 2010-2015

    HIV/AIDS is universally recognized as a threat to development worldwide.Through consultations with stakeholders, NAC undertook to develop a communication strategy as part of national HIV/AIDS advocacy strategy to increase awareness about the evidence-informed linkage between MDG 6 and all other MDGs. The purpose of the Communication strategy is to build up the knowledge of the population regarding the linkages between HIV/AIDS and the MDGs. The strategy draws on the lessons from the twin and parallel work on documenting that linkage from 1990 to 2008.

  10. Intervention and results of combating school-related gender-based violence in Democratic Republic of Congo

    This powerpoint presents the outcome of a project which aimed to promote positive social and gender norms to prevent and mitigate SRGBV in Katanga Province, DRC. …

  11. Give us a chance: National study on school-related gender-based violence in Sierra Leone

    The main objective of the study is to contribute to efforts aimed at enhancing children's access to quality basic education and strengthening protection against GBV in and on the way to school. The study seeks to generate reliable data and information on causes, forms, victims and perpetrators of GBV within the school settings, which will inform advocacy and the design of appropriate interventions to reduce incidences of GBV and its impact on educational outcomes. …

  12. Ending school related gender violence in Nsanje district, Malawi: baseline study

    Concern Worldwide has initiated a project called Ending School Related Gender-Based Violence in Malawi to run from 2012 to 2015. The goal of the new program is that the right of girls to access quality primary education, free from all forms of violence and discrimination, be actively promoted by schools, communities and the State in Nsanje District. The expected outcomes of the program are: 1. A safe learning environment for girls is ensured in 17 primary schools in Nsanje; 2. …

  13. The government of Kenya cash transfer for orphaned and vulnerable children: cross-sectional comparison of household and individual characteristics of those with and without

    Background: The ‘Cash Transfer to Orphans and Vulnerable Children’ (CT-OVC) in Kenya is a government-supported program intended to provide regular and predictable cash transfers (CT) to poor households taking care of OVC. CT programs can be an effective means of alleviating poverty and facilitating the attainment of an adequate standard of living for people’s health and well-being and other international human rights. …

  14. Education sector policy for orphans and vulnerable children

    The goal of this policy is to ensure that an increased number of OVC are able to access, remain in, and complete general education of good quality. The objective of this policy is to ensure that all OVC of school-going age attend school and are not deterred from full participation through lack of financial means, material or psychosocial need, stigma, discrimination or any other constraints, and to ensure that out-of school OVC are brought back into school or provided with appropriate alternative educational opportunities.

  15. WASH in schools empowers girls’ education. Proceedings of the Menstrual Hygiene Management in Schools Virtual Conference 2012

    WASH in Schools (WinS) fosters social inclusion and individual self-respect. By offering an alternative to the stigma and marginalization associated with hygiene issues, it empowers all students – and especially encourages girls and female teachers. In recognition of the positive impact on girls’ school attendance and achievement, initiatives around the world are addressing adolescent girls’ menstrual hygiene management (MHM) needs through WinS programming. …

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