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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Jamaica’s policy for the school reintegration of school-age mothers. How are we doing and where do we need to go?

    This paper examines the prevalence of teenage pregnancy in Jamaica, the girls most affected, and where and when they are most vulnerable. The paper also discusses the provisions for continuing education under the National Policy for the Reintegration of School-Age Mothers into the Formal School System. It assesses whether the policy is reaching the target group and its effectiveness in addressing access to secondary education for teen mothers.

  2. Accelerating progress toward the reduction of adolescent pregnancy in Latin America and the Caribbean: Report of a technical consultation

    This report summarizes the key discussions and recommendations emanating from the meeting, which can be used collectively as a “Call to Action” as well as a tool for regional stakeholders including national health, education, and social sector authorities and programs, regional partners, civil society, communities, parents, and young people, to intensify efforts, revise and update strategies, and scale up approaches that: 1) empower adolescent girls to prevent unplanned and unwanted pregnancies, 2) protect them from sexual violence, 3) improve their development opportunities, and 4) help them  …

  3. Feminist Formations

    Articles from this issue : Girls’ schooling, gender equity, and the global education and development agenda: conceptual disconnections, political struggles, and the difficulties of practice, Situating empowerment for millennial schoolgirls in Gujarat, India and Shaanxi, China, engendering agency: the differentiated impact of educational initiatives in Zambia and India, History transformed?: Gender in World War II narratives in U.S. …

  4. Supporting the academic success of pregnant and parenting students under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972

    This pamphlet has been prepared for secondary school administrators, teachers, counselors, parents, and students. The first section provides background on school retention problems associated with pregnant and parenting students. The next two sections, “Title IX Requirements Regarding Pregnant and Parenting Students” and “Frequently Asked Questions Pertaining to Title IX Requirements Regarding Pregnant and Parenting Students,” provide information on the law’s specific requirements regarding pregnancy and parenthood. …

  5. Adolescent motherhood and secondary schooling in Chile

    The authors analyze the determinants of adolescent motherhood and its subsequent effect on high school attendance and completion in Chile. Using eight rounds of household surveys, they find that adolescents who were born to teen mothers, those that live in poor households and in single-mother families, are more likely to have children, while access to full-time high schools reduces the likelihood of motherhood. They then estimate the effect of adolescent motherhood on the probability of high school attendance and completion. …

  6. National policy reintegration of school-age mothers into the formal school system

    Pregnancy remains the highest risk factor for female dropout rates, both before and after reintegration. This does not align with national policy goals outlined in the Vision 2030 document, and retards Jamaica’s fulfilment of international treaties, commitments and policy guidelines. This policy purports to address this deficit, and establishes a framework for inter-agency collaboration to address the wider issues that limit the reintegration of school-age mothers into the formal school system.

  7. WASH in schools empowers girls’ education. Proceedings of the Menstrual Hygiene Management in Schools Virtual Conference 2012

    WASH in Schools (WinS) fosters social inclusion and individual self-respect. By offering an alternative to the stigma and marginalization associated with hygiene issues, it empowers all students – and especially encourages girls and female teachers. In recognition of the positive impact on girls’ school attendance and achievement, initiatives around the world are addressing adolescent girls’ menstrual hygiene management (MHM) needs through WinS programming. …

  8. Educational formations: Gendered experiences of schooling in local contexts

    Content: - Educational Formations: Gendered Experiences of Schooling in Local Contexts; Girls’ Schooling, Gender Equity, and the Global Education and Development Agenda: Conceptual Disconnections, Political Struggles, and the Difficulties of Practice; Situating Empowerment for Millennial Schoolgirls in Gujarat, India and Shaanxi, China; Engendering Agency: The Differentiated Impact of Educational Initiatives in Zambia and India; History Transformed?: Gender in World War II Narratives in U.S. …

  9. WASH in schools empowers girls' education. Proceedings of the menstrual hygiene mananagement in schools virtual conference 2013

    There is increasing interest in exploring and addressing the menstrual hygiene management (MHM) barriers facing schoolgirls and female teachers in educational settings. Around the globe, WASH in Schools (WinS) focuses on fostering social inclusion and individual self-respect – and addresses MHM as a key agenda. By offering an alternative to the stigma and marginalization associated with hygiene issues, integrating MHM into WinS empowers all students, and especially encourages girls and female teachers. …

  10. Multifaceted Adolescent Reproductive Health Education Strategies in Panama

    Reproductive health education relates directly to six of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals, including that of combating HIV/AIDS. The need for high-impact adolescent sexual and preoductive health care programs has become a primary concern for global health organizations. Regarding HIV/AIDS prevalence, Panama is at a critical point in which the situation can either drastically improve or deteriorate depending on how it is addressed. …

  11. Schools Against AIDS: Secondary School Enrollment and Cross-National Disparities in AIDS Death Rates

    Although AIDS is a leading cause of death worldwide, the consequences of the pandemic are remarkably unequally distributed cross-nationally. This unequal global distribution of AIDS deaths should be of interest to sociologists because of the potential role of structural forces in accounting for these disparities. Yet, there has been relatively little sociological research on this topic. Using underutilized cross national data on AIDS deaths, this study examines the macro-level sources of variation in AIDS death rates across 115 countries. …

  12. Education sector simplified policy on school health, nutrition and HIV&AIDS

    This booklet is a simplification of Guyana's Education Sector Policy on School Health, Nutrition and HIV& AIDS. It was designed for students, teachers, managers, employers, and other providers of education and training in educational institutions in Guyana. The booklet is intended to be an easy-to-use education and reference tool for Guyana's education sector – both formal and informal, and public and private. Its simplified content will allow for easier assimilation of the policy, and, consequently, greater understanding of individual, institutional and organizational rights and obligations.

  13. Programs to address child marriage: Framing the problem

    Child marriage violates girls’ human rights and adversely affects their health and well-being. While age at marriage is increasing in most regions of the developing world, early marriage persists for large populations. Worldwide, it is estimated that more than one out of three women aged 20–24 were married before age 18, and one out of seven were married before age 15. There is great variation in child marriage practices across and within regions and between ethnic and religious groups. Eradicating child marriage has long been on the agenda of the United Nations and of individual countries. …

  14. Education of children with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    Treatment for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has enabled more children and youths to attend school and participate in school activities. Children and youths with HIV infection should receive the same education as those with other chronic illnesses. They may require special services, including home instruction, to provide continuity of education. Confidentiality about HIV infection status should be maintained with parental consent required for disclosure. Youths also should assent or consent as is appropriate for disclosure of their diagnosis.

  15. The hidden crisis: armed conflict and education; EFA global monitoring report, 2011

    Violent conflict is one of the greatest development challenges facing the international community. Beyond the immediate human suffering it causes, it is a source of poverty, inequality and economic stagnation. Children and education systems are often on the front line of violent conflict. The 2011 Global Monitoring Report examines the damaging consequences of conflict for the Education for All goals. …

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