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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Keeping African girls in school with better sanitary care

    For young girls in developing countries, not knowing how to manage their periods can hinder access to education. Research from the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London demonstrates that in rural Uganda, providing free sanitary products and lessons about puberty to girls may increase their attendance at school.

  2. Child marriage in West and Central Africa at a glance

    Child marriage in West and Central Africa is one of the biggest challenges in the region and has enormous adverse effects on education, health, including sexual and reproductive health, and on the overall development of adolescents and youth. This brochure provides recent data and analysis of child marriage in the region.

  3. Teenage pregnancy and school drop-out in South Africa: facts, figures and possible interventions

    This fact sheet is designed for educators, concerned community and parent organisations, as well as education officials. It provides facts and figures on teenage pregnancy in South Africa, and offers suggestions for reducing the number of girl learners who fall pregnant, and as well as suggestions for getting young mothers back into school. This fact sheet, the third in a series of five, is based on the HSRC’s 2009 Teenage Pregnancy Report and the Access to Education study, which was undertaken by Social Surveys and the Centre for Applied Legal Studies (CALS). …

  4. Getting pregnant schoolgirls back to school!

    This brief outlines the current legal situation in Tanzania with respect to attendance of pregnant schoolgirls as well as the benefits of educational attendance for pregnant school girls and young mothers.

  5. Report card. HIV prevention for girls and young women: Nigeria

    This report card aims to provide a summary of HIV prevention for girls and young women in Nigeria. This Report Card is one in a series produced by the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), under the umbrella of the Global Coalition on Women and AIDS, and with the support of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and Young Positives. The Report Card is an advocacy tool. It aims to increase and improve the programmatic, policy and funding actions taken on HIV prevention for girls and young women in Nigeria. …

  6. Report card. HIV prevention for girls and young women: Ethiopia

    This report card aims to provide a summary of HIV prevention for girls and young women in Ethiopia. This Report Card is one in a series produced by the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), under the umbrella of the Global Coalition on Women and AIDS, and with the support of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and Young Positives. The Report Card is an advocacy tool. It aims to increase and improve the programmatic, policy and funding actions taken on HIV prevention for girls and young women in Ethiopia. …

  7. Report card. HIV prevention for girls and young women: Rwanda

    This report card aims to provide a summary of HIV prevention for girls and young women in Rwanda. This Report Card is one in a series produced by the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), under the umbrella of the Global Coalition on Women and AIDS, and with the support of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and Young Positives. The Report Card is an advocacy tool. It aims to increase and improve the programmatic, policy and funding actions taken on HIV prevention for girls and young women in Rwanda. …

  8. Report card. HIV prevention for girls and young women: Mozambique

    This report card aims to provide a summary of HIV prevention for girls and young women in Mozambique. This Report Card is one in a series produced by the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), under the umbrella of the Global Coalition on Women and AIDS, and with the support of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and Young Positives. The Report Card is an advocacy tool. It aims to increase and improve the programmatic, policy and funding actions taken on HIV prevention for girls and young women in Mozambique. …

  9. Report card. HIV prevention for girls and young women: Cameroon

    This report card aims to provide a summary of HIV prevention for girls and young women in Cameroon. The Report Card is one in a series produced by the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), under the umbrella of the Global Coalition on Women and AIDS, and with the support of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and Young Positives. The Report Card is an advocacy tool. It aims to increase and improve the programmatic, policy and funding actions taken on HIV prevention for girls and young women in Cameroon. …

  10. Report card. HIV prevention for girls and young women: Kenya

    This report card aims to provide a summary of HIV prevention for girls and young women in Kenya. The Report Card is one in a series produced by the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), under the umbrella of the Global Coalition on Women and AIDS, and with the support of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and Young Positives. The Report Card is an advocacy tool. It aims to increase and improve the programmatic, policy and funding actions taken on HIV prevention for girls and young women in Kenya. …

  11. No small issue: Children and families. Universal Action Now

    In 2007, an estimated total of 2 million children were living with HIV - eight times more than in 1990 - while both new infections and deaths among children have grown three-fold globally since 1990. Around 90% of these children live in sub-Saharan Africa, where 12.1 million children are estimated to have lost one or both parents to AIDS. This plenary presentation argues that children and families have been severely neglected in responses to HIV and AIDS. …

  12. One in Two: Children are the key to Africa's future

    Children make up half the population of many African countries, and the proportion is growing.Yet, when it comes to decisions about Africa's problems and its future, they are rarely central to the debate. The role of protecting the poorest and most vulnerable children is left to the poorest government ministries.The poorest families are forced to pay for - or go without - healthcare for their children. …

  13. Letting them fail: Government neglect and the right to education for children affected by AIDS

    Governments in sub-Saharan Africa have failed to address the extraordinary barriers to education faced by children who are orphaned or otherwise affected by HIV/AIDS. An estimated 43 million school-age children do not attend school in the region. HIV/AIDS has caused unprecedented rates of adult mortality, leaving millions of children without parental care to ensure their access to education. …

  14. Learning to survive: how education for all would save millions of young people from HIV/AIDS

    Universal primary education (UPE) could save at least 7 million young people from contracting HIV over a decade. However, without dramatic increases in aid to education, Africa will not be able to get every child into school for another 150 years. This report sets out why UPE is crucial to halting the spread of HIV/AIDS, and outlines what both rich and poor countries need to do now to enable millions of children to learn ... to survive.

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