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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Rethinking sexual agency: proposing a multicomponent model based on young people’s life stories

    Sexual health policies explicitly aim to encourage young people to take responsibility for their sexuality to prevent adverse outcomes such as unintended pregnancies, STIs and sexual assault. In Europe and North America, ‘choice’ has become a central concept in sexual and reproductive health policy making. However, the concept of choice is not unproblematic, not least because the cultural emphasis on individual responsibility obscures structural limitations and inequalities, and mutual responsibility between partners. …

  2. Developing guidelines for comprehensive sexuality education

    Educators, service providers, and health professionals worldwide are advocating that young people receive comprehensive sexuality education to help them become sexually healthy adults and to help them practice safer sexual behaviors, delay the onset of sexual intercourse, and reduce unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted disease (STD) rates. Though there is often consensus that young people should receive such education, few actually do. This is primarily due to a lack of understanding and consensus about sexuality education goals, components, and standards. …

  3. Promoting parent engagement in schools to prevent HIV and other STDs among teens: information for state and local education agencies

    Parent engagement in schools is defined as parents and school staff working together to support and improve the learning, development, and health of children and adolescents (See Box 1). School staff may already engage parents in a variety of ways that support teens’ academic success, such as through parent-teacher conferences and open houses. …

  4. Guidance for implementing the policy‐related activities of promoting adolescent health through school‐based HIV/STD prevention (funded state education agency version)

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for implementing the policy-related required activities for state education agencies awarded funding under Strategy 2: School-Based HIV/STD Prevention. The intended outcome of these activities is to increase the number of funded states and districts that track policy implementation and educate decision makers on policy solutions. There is a separate document for funded local education agencies, with guidance on implementing their specific 1308 policy-related required activities.

  5. Guidance for implementing the policy‐related activities of promoting adolescent health through school‐based HIV/STD prevention (funded local education agency version)

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for implementing the policy‐related required activities for local education agencies awarded funding under Strategy 2: School‐Based HIV/STD Prevention. The intended outcome of these activities is to increase the number of funded states and districts that track policy implementation and educate decision makers on policy solutions. There is a separate document for funded state education agencies, with guidance on implementing their specific 1308 policy‐related required activities.

  6. 3Rs campaign kit: rights, respect, responsibility: the campaign

    Rights. Respect. Responsibility.® is Advocates for Youth’s national, long-term campaign giving voice to a new vision of adolescent sexual health. These core values underpin Advocates’ vision of a society where adolescents are valued, public health policy is driven by scientific research, and sexuality is viewed as a normal and healthy part of being human, of being a teen, of being alive.

  7. Best practices for youth-friendly sexual and reproductive health services in schools

    This document provides recommendations for school nurses and health center staff on nine essential components of youth-friendly services – confidentiality, respectful treatment, integrated services, culturally appropriate care, easy access to care, free or low cost services, reproductive and sexual health care, services for young men, and promoting parent-child communication.

  8. Invited commentary: Broadening the evidence for adolescent sexual and reproductive health and education in the United States

    Scientific research has made major contributions to adolescent health by providing insights into factors that influence it and by defining ways to improve it. However, US adolescent sexual and reproductive health policies-particularly sexuality health education policies and programs-have not benefited from the full scope of scientific understanding. From 1998 to 2009, federal funding for sexuality education focused almost exclusively on ineffective and scientifically inaccurate abstinence-only-until-marriage (AOUM) programs. …

  9. High income countries issue brief: rights of children and young people to access HIV-related services

    This brief focuses on the rights of children (minors under the age of 18 years) in high-income countries to access health services related to HIV prevention – in particular sexual and reproductive health services, and harm reduction services and drug treatment services. …

  10. Support for comprehensive sexuality education: perspectives from parents of school-age youth

    Controversy about school-based sexuality education in public schools has continued over the past decade, despite mounting evidence that comprehensive sexuality education effectively promotes sexual health and that parents support these programs in public schools. The present study replicates and expands upon previous findings regarding public views on school-based sexuality education. …

  11. Teens and Sex in Europe: A Story of Rights, Respect and Responsibility

    This video documents the approaches and attitudes to sexuality education in the Netherlands, Germany and France as compared to those of the U.S., as the latter country has higher rates of teenage pregnandy, birth and sexually transmitted diseases. It documents teens, parents, government officials, educators and health care providers' views. Media clips of HIV and AIDS campaigns are used to supplement the documentary information.

  12. Adolescents' reports of reproductive health education, 1988 and 1995

    This study used formal reproductive health education and communication with parents on reproductive health among 15-19 year old males from the National Survey of Adolescent Males (1988 and 1995). Female adolescent reports were taken from the 1995 National Survey of Family Growth. During this period, reproductive health education became almost universal among adolescent males. The percentage of males receiving information on HIV and AIDS rose from 73% to 97% and percentage receiving instruction on saying no to sex rose from 58% to 75%. Those who dropped out of school received less education. …

  13. Becoming a responsible teen adaptation kit. Tools and resources for making informed adaptations to BART: Becoming a responsible teen

    Although the primary goal of Becoming a Responsible Teen (BART) is to decrease HIV infection among African-American adolescents ages 14 to 18, the curriculum also includes topics and activities relevant to teen pregnancy prevention. Teens learn to clarify their own values about sexual decisions and pressures, as well as practice skills to reduce sexual risk taking. These skills include correct condom use, assertive communication, refusal techniques, self-management and problem solving. Abstinence is woven throughout the curriculum and is discussed as the best way to prevent HIV and pregnancy. …

  14. The evaluation of abstinence education programs funded under title V section 510: interim report

    This report presents interim findings from an independent, federally funded evaluation of the abstinence education programs authorized under the Personal Responsability and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA). This report draws on four years of implementation experiences in a selected group of abstinence education programs.

  15. Executive Summary: Sexual risk and protective factors. Factors affecting teen sexual behavior, pregnancy, childbearing and sexually transmitted disease: What are important? Which can you change?

    Executive Summary: Sexual Risk and Protective Factors. Factors Affecting Teen Sexual Behavior, Pregnancy, Childbearing And Sexually Transmitted Disease: What Are Important? Which Can You Change? is a document part of the project of the United States National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. It addresses two main primary questions: 1) what factors influence adolescents' decisions about sex? And 2) Which of these factors can be altered? By identifying and targeting those factors it tries to provide information to reduce sexual risk-taking.

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