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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Life Doesn’t Wait. Romania’s Failure to Protect and Support Children and Youth Living with HIV

    More than 7,200 Romanian children and youth age fifteen to nineteen are living with HIV—the largest such group in any European country. The vast majority were infected with HIV between 1986 and 1991 as a direct result of government policies that exposed them to contaminated needles and “microtransfusions” of unscreened blood. Despite Romania’s progressive expansion of access to antiretroviral drugs, these children and youth face pervasive stigma and discrimination that often impedes their enjoyment of basic rights and services. …

  2. Experiences from the field: HIV prevention among most at risk adolescents in Central and Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States

    In recent years, UNICEF has worked together with national and local authorities and civil society partners in a number of countries in Eastern Europe and Central Asia to develop and implement HIV prevention programmes intended to reduce risks and vul¬nerabilities among most-at-risk adolescents (MARA.) This docu¬ment presents programming experiences from seven countries: Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH), Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia and Ukraine. …

  3. HIV infection and sexual risk behaviour among youth who have experienced orphanhood: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Background: Previous research has suggested that orphaned children and adolescents might have elevated risk for HIV infection. We examined the state of evidence regarding the association between orphan status and HIV risk in studies of youth aged 24 years and younger. Methods: Using systematic review methodology, we identified 10 studies reporting data from 12 countries comparing orphaned and non-orphaned youth on HIV-related risk indicators, including HIV serostatus, other sexually transmitted infections, pregnancy and sexual behaviours. …

  4. Just normal young people: supporting young people living with HIV in their transition to adulthood

    Thanks to advances in HIV treatment, children who were born with HIV are now living into adulthood. Services working with children and adults living with HIV have needed to adapt to support this cohort of young adults with lifelong HIV infection. Likewise, services need to meet the needs of young people who are acquiring HIV in other ways. This report considers how young people living with HIV make the transition from childhood to adulthood and, in particular, changes in services and support for young people that occur during this time. …

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