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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Promoting parent engagement in schools to prevent HIV and other STDs among teens: information for state and local education agencies

    Parent engagement in schools is defined as parents and school staff working together to support and improve the learning, development, and health of children and adolescents (See Box 1). School staff may already engage parents in a variety of ways that support teens’ academic success, such as through parent-teacher conferences and open houses. …

  2. Addressing cross-generational sex: A desk review of research and programs

    Current interest in cross-generational sex is largely due to the feminization of the HIV and AIDS epidemic. Young women 15-24 years of age in sub-Saharan Africa are three times more likely to be infected with HIV than young men of the same age, four times more likely in Zambia, and a staggering five times more likely in Zimbabwe. But, in fact, ministries of education and others have had curricula and materials addressing the “sugar daddy” phenomenon for many years. …

  3. Young people's experiences in youth-led participatory action research for HIV/AIDS prevention

    As part of a project in the UNICEF-initiated “What every adolescent has a right to know” (RTK) program, qualitative interviews were conducted with youth (13 to 21 years of age) who were reached through a youth-led participatory action research (PAR) project. The interviews were conducted with both urban and rural participants in a Caribbean country where potential exposure to HIV/AIDS represents a significant threat to young people’s health. The purpose of the study was to examine how a truly youth organized PAR effort was perceived by the adolescents who were reached through the project. …

  4. Linkage to Care for HIV-Positive Adolescents: A Multisite Study of the Adolescent Medicine Trials Units of the Adolescent Trials Network

    This journal article is a study of adolescent linkage to HIV care in the United States. The study seeks to understand the issues with linkage to care among adolescents. The study shows that multiple models exist for linkage to care and that it is important to have formal and informal community relationships for linkage to care to work among adolescents. The barriers that linkage to care for adolescents face is structural rather than due to adolescent characteristics. For instance, stigmatisation is a big issue which can be addressed through community and education. …

  5. Making HIV prevention programming count: identifying predictors of success in a parent-based HIV prevention program for youth

    Predictors of change in the number of sexual topics parents discussed and responsiveness during sex communication with their preadolescent after participating in a five-session sexual risk reduction intervention for parents were examined. Data were from 339 African American parents of preadolescents enrolled in the intervention arm of a randomized-controlled trial of the Parents’ Matter! Program (PMP). …

  6. You Asked... We Answered! Answers to Questions on HIV and AIDS Asked by Youth in Southern Africa. HIV and AIDS : How Can I Make A Difference? Part (iii)

    As youth, YOU are the most important resources in our countries! Your health and wellbeing will help determine the future of communities and countries in which you live. You are considered to be an ACTION FORCE, not a target group, and have a special understanding of the health and developmental issues facing you. We recognise that you need to be involved in all aspects of planning activities aimed at your age group, that is why we went to youth to find out what questions you haveabout your sexuality and HIV and AIDS! …

  7. You Asked... We Answered! Answers to Questions on HIV and AIDS Asked by Youth in Southern Africa. HIV and AIDS: Lets talk about sex! Part (ii)

    As youth,YOU are the most important resources in our countries! Your health and wellbeing will help determine the future of communities and countries in which you live. You are considered to be an ACTION FORCE, not a target group, and have a special understanding of the health and developmental issues facing you. We recognise that you need to be involved in all aspects of planning activities aimed at your age group, that is why we went to youth to find out what questions you haveabout your sexuality and HIV and AIDS! …

  8. You Asked... We Answered! Answers to Questions on HIV and AIDS Asked by Youth in Southern Africa. HIV and AIDS : Get the Facts! Part (i)

    As youth, YOU are the most important resources in our countries! Your health and wellbeing will help determine the future of communities and countries in which you live. You are considered to be an ACTION FORCE, not a target group, and have a special understanding of the health and developmental issues facing you. We recognise that you need to be involved in all aspects of planning activities aimed at your age group, that is why we went to youth to find out what questions you haveabout your sexuality and HIV and AIDS! …

  9. A tale of two countries: rethinking sexual risk for HIV among young people in South Africa and the United States

    This paper compares the sexual behaviors of young people in South Africa (SA) and the United States (US) with the aim of better understanding the potential role of sexual behavior in HIV transmission in these two countries that have strikingly different HIV epidemics. Nationally representative, population-based surveys of young people ages 18-24 years from SA (n = 7,548) and the US (n = 13,451) were used. The prevalence of HIV was 10.2% in SA and 1% in the US. …

  10. Sexual and reproductive health for young HIV positive adolescents: the club concept in support groups

    This manual is for people who work with young adolescents. It provides them with knowledge and materials to create support groups (clubs) for HIV-positive adolescents to arm them with information to make healthy choices.

  11. Young, Black, Beautiful and In Control Poster

    Young, Black, Beautiful and In Control Poster. We're young, black, beautiful and In control. We decide when to have sex...and we always use a condom.

  12. Evaluation of a theoretically based AIDS/STD peer education program on postponing sexual intercourse and on condom use among adolescents attending high school

    This study aimed to evaluate the theories of Ajzen (Planned Behavior) and Triandis (Interpersonal Behavior) on influencing 698 junior high school students and 306 senior high school students at two sites in Quebec, Canada. Baseline questionnaires were completed as well as at 9 months of follow-up. …

  13. Comparison of Health Education and STD Risk Reduction Interventions for Incarcerated Adolescent Females

    Adolescent girls imprisoned in state reformatories were recruited (N=246) to an 18-month health education or HIV prevention program. A randomized block design was used to assign girls to one of the two programs. Girls in the HIV prevention program had improved risk reduction and condom use skills. At 9 months of follow-up, girls in both groups reported less sex under the influence of alcohol or drugs and less unprotected sex.

  14. The Association of AIDS Education and Sex Education with Sexual Behavior and Condom Use Among Teenage Men

    A 1998 national U.S. survey of 15-19 year olds found that 73% had received education about AIDS, 79% about birth control and 58% about resisting sexual activity. Multivariate analysis shows that AIDS and sex education moderately but significantly decreased number of sexual partners and frequency of intercourse in the year prior to the survey. This type of education was also associated with more consistent condom use. Education on some topics was associated with increased knowledge and improved attitudes about AIDS, but these did not always correlate with safer sexual behavior.

  15. Sexually Active Adolescents have Less Knowledge and Less Fear of HIV than their Abstinent Peers

    A study in four districts of Rhode Island (USA) of 1,379 junior high school students (average age 13.2 years) found that sexually active boys were less knowledgeable about HIV, less tolerant of people living with AIDS, less fearful of contraction of HIV and more likely to undertake risky behavior, than those who were not sexually active. The same pattern, although less extreme, is found among girls in the sample. …

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