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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. From ideas to action: addressing barriers to comprehensive sexuality education in the classroom

    Evidence for the positive outcomes of comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) on adolescent sexual and reproductive health (ASRH) is well documented.

  2. Adolescent schoolgirls’ experiences of menstrual cups and pads in rural western Kenya: a qualitative study

    Poor menstrual hygiene management (MHM) among schoolgirls in low income countries affects girls' dignity, self-esteem, and schooling. Hygienic, effective, and sustainable menstrual products are required. A randomized controlled feasibility study was conducted among 14-16-year-old girls, in 30 primary schools in rural western Kenya, to examine acceptability, use, and safety of menstrual cups or sanitary pads. Focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted to evaluate girls' perceptions and experiences six months after product introduction. …

  3. Comprehensive sexuality education for out of school young people in East and Southern Africa

    The Regional Comprehensive Sexuality Education Resource Package for Out of School Young People was developed to age and developmentally relevant international standards as a comprehensive set of teaching and learning materials for flexible use in settings outside the formal classrooms of the education sector. Several countries of East and Southern Africa have adapted this regional set of materials for nationally endorsed implementation. …

  4. All in, in Eastern and Southern Africa: catalysing the HIV response for adolescents

    The report demonstrates progress made on adolescent HIV programming in the Eastern and Southern African Region (ESAR) in a few short years. Qualitative in approach, the report explores how the impact of HIV on adolescents and young people was given visibility and focus as a result of the All In to end adolescent AIDS (All In) country assessments, which systematically reviewed and analyzed data, programmes and strategies currently responding to adolescent HIV.

  5. Challenges to implementing national comprehensive sexuality education curricula in low- and middle-income countries: case studies of Ghana, Kenya, Peru and Guatemala

    School-based comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) can help adolescents achieve their full potential and realize their sexual and reproductive health and rights. This is particularly pressing in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where high rates of unintended pregnancy and STIs among adolescents can limit countries’ ability to capitalize on the demographic dividend. While many LMICs have developed CSE curricula, their full implementation is often hindered by challenges around program planning and roll-out at the national and local level. …

  6. Parents’ and teachers’ views on sexual health education and screening for sexually transmitted infections among in-school adolescent girls in Kenya: a qualitative study

    Background: To successfully develop and implement school-based sexual health interventions for adolescent girls, such as screening for Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Trichomonas vaginalis, it is important to understand parents’ and teachers’ attitudes towards sexual health education and acceptability of sexually transmitted infection (STI) screening interventions. Methods: In this qualitative study, we approached parents and teachers from three high schools to participate in in-depth interviews (IDIs) and focus-group discussions (FGDs). …

  7. CSE scale-up in practice. Case studies from Eastern and Southern Africa

    The report documents the process of scaling up comprehensive sexuality education and the status of sexuality education in East and Southern Africa.

  8. WASH in schools empowers girls’ education: Proceedings of the 5th Annual Virtual Conference on Menstrual Hygiene Management in Schools

    Capturing girls’ voices: Channelling girls’ recommendations into global and national level action. Globally, there are around 600 million adolescent girls. Adolescence is a pivotal transitional period that requires special attention to ensure progress for all girls, especially the most vulnerable, and poses a unique opportunity to break intergenerational cycles of poverty and to transform gender roles. The onset of puberty and menstruation can pose an additional barrier to a girl’s personal freedom, and can signal entry into a different role in their family and wider society. …

  9. Experimental evaluation of school-based HIV programs in sub-Saharan Africa

    School-based adolescent health education programs represent a durable strategy in reducing the spread of HIV because they can leverage pre-existing social and organizational structures to reach large fractions of students at critical life stages. Many evaluations of school-based HIV programs draw on multilevel study designs that assign schools to treatment conditions or assign students to treatment conditions within blocks defined by school membership. …

  10. Education, HIV, and early fertility: experimental evidence from Kenya

    A seven-year randomized evaluation suggests education subsidies reduce adolescent girls’ dropout, pregnancy, and marriage but not sexually transmitted infection (STI). The government’s HIV curriculum, which stresses abstinence until marriage, does not reduce pregnancy or STI. Both programs combined reduce STI more, but cut dropout and pregnancy less, than education subsidies alone. …

  11. Kenya: helping adolescent mothers remain in school through strengthened implementation of school re-entry policies

    The goal of this case study is to document an activity of the STEP UP research programme consortium which resulted in successful evidence utilization. This is to both demonstrate the positive impact STEP UP is having on family planning and reproductive health policies, as well as to document the process by which this was achieved so as to inform future research of successful strategies and lessons learned. …

  12. Adolescent and youth sexual and reproductive health-evidence-based interventions in Kenya

    In 2011, the Division of Reproductive Health (DRH) in collaboration with FHI 360 undertook a review of adolescent and youth reproductive health programs in the country that included a desk review, mapping of youth serving organizations (YSOs), and interviews with stakeholders from the YSOs and development partners. …

  13. Education for pregnant girls and young mothers. Helpdesk report

    How do Kenya, Nigeria and the UK deal with girls who get pregnant at school in terms of: (1) what the policy is around when they should leave school to have their baby, and whether this is actually implemented; (2) whether formal education is provided while they are away having their babies, how this is delivered, and whether it actually has impact on their learning; and (3) the kind of support girls get for going back to school once they have their babies and how negative attitudes are overcome. Additionally: Identify any information on bridging schools in Ghana and Liberia.

  14. Let’s step up and deliver!

    This call for action was formulated by the Ministers of Education, Health, Gender, and Youth and senior government officials, gathered in Durban, South Africa, on 18 July 2016 for the Eastern and Southern Africa (ESA) Ministerial Commitment Progress Meeting in order to commit themselves to step up efforts to ensure adolescents’ and young people’s access to good quality CSE and youth-friendly SRH services in the ESA region, and to work in partnership with young people, parents, civil society, and community and religious leaders to achieve the goals set out in the 2013 ESA Commitment.

  15. Expanding access to secondary school education for teenage mothers in Kenya: a baseline study report

    The objectives of this study were to: 1) foster an understanding of the current situation and context in regard to out-of-school teenage mothers and their potential support systems for school re-entry at the household and school levels in Homa Bay County, 2) clarify possible solutions for promoting school re-entry on the part of out-of-school girls, their families, and the education sector, and 3) provide a benchmark against which changes resulting from an intervention to promote school re-entry may be measured by the endline period.

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