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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Cost-effectiveness analysis: educational interventions that reduce the incidence of HIV/AIDS infection in Kenyan teenagers

    This paper demonstrates a comprehensive and thorough application of an education cost-effectiveness analysis. Two interventions implemented in Western Kenya aimed to reduce the incidence of HIV/AIDS contraction in middle school girls. The cost-effectiveness of each intervention is assessed, ex post facto, by combining the results of the two programs’ evaluations with their costs. As few education evaluations consider cost, this article highlights a sound and disciplined method to use when detailed cost information is both readily available and unavailable. …

  2. Experimental evaluation of school-based HIV programs in sub-Saharan Africa

    School-based adolescent health education programs represent a durable strategy in reducing the spread of HIV because they can leverage pre-existing social and organizational structures to reach large fractions of students at critical life stages. Many evaluations of school-based HIV programs draw on multilevel study designs that assign schools to treatment conditions or assign students to treatment conditions within blocks defined by school membership. …

  3. Education, HIV, and early fertility: experimental evidence from Kenya

    A seven-year randomized evaluation suggests education subsidies reduce adolescent girls’ dropout, pregnancy, and marriage but not sexually transmitted infection (STI). The government’s HIV curriculum, which stresses abstinence until marriage, does not reduce pregnancy or STI. Both programs combined reduce STI more, but cut dropout and pregnancy less, than education subsidies alone. …

  4. Tuko Pamoja: A guide for peer educators

    This guide was developed by PATH as part of the Kenya Adolescent Reproductive Health Project (KARHP) Tuko Pamoja ("We are together") series. It is intended to be used by peer educators facilitating discussion groups with in- and out-of-school youth. The guide will help peer educators share information and lead discussions with their peers on addressing physical and emotional changes during adolescence, staying healthy, planning for the future, making good decisions, and preventing pregnancy and HIV and AIDS. …

  5. Addressing cross-generational sex: A desk review of research and programs

    Current interest in cross-generational sex is largely due to the feminization of the HIV and AIDS epidemic. Young women 15-24 years of age in sub-Saharan Africa are three times more likely to be infected with HIV than young men of the same age, four times more likely in Zambia, and a staggering five times more likely in Zimbabwe. But, in fact, ministries of education and others have had curricula and materials addressing the “sugar daddy” phenomenon for many years. …

  6. Mapping HIV services and policies for adolescents: A survey of ten countries in sub-Saharan Africa

    PEPFAR and USAID, in collaboration with UNICEF, supported AIDSTAR-One in conducting a mapping activity to identify HIV policies and services for adolescents in 10 sub-Saharan African countries: Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. This technical report summarizes AIDSTAR-One’s findings and is a resource for program planners and policymakers working to improve services and policies for HIV prevention, care, and treatment among adolescents and ALHIV in sub-Saharan Africa. …

  7. Relative Risks and the Market for Sex: Teenagers, Sugar Daddies and HIV in Kenya

    An information campaign that provided Kenyan teenagers in randomly selected schools with the information that HIV prevalence was much higher among adult men and their partners than among teenage boys led to a 65% decrease in the incidence of pregnancies by adult partners among teenage girls in the treatment group relative to the comparison. This suggests a large reduction in the incidence of unprotected cross-generational sex. The information campaign did not increase pregnancies among teenage couples. …

  8. Evaluating the Kenya Girl Guides Association’s HIV/AIDS Peer Education Program for Younger Youth: Baseline Results

    The Kenya Girl Guide Association (KGGA) and Family Health International (FHI)/Impact began a program, which was developed by PATH, in 1999 to train young Girl Guides as HIV peer educators in their schools. The project aims to improve knowledge and skills related to HIV prevention and care among Girl Guides and their peers. In collaboration with KGGA and FHI/Impact, the Horizons Program is currently conducting a study to evaluate the effectiveness of this intervention model in achieving the objectives of the peer education program. …

  9. Education, HIV, and early fertility: experimental evidence from Kenya

    We provide experimental evidence on the relationships between education, HIV/AIDS education, risky behavior and early fertility in Kenya. We exploit randomly assigned variation in the cost of schooling and in exposure to the national HIV/AIDS prevention curriculum for a cohort of over 19,000 adolescents in Western Kenya, originally aged 13.5 on average. We collected data on the schooling, marriage, and fertility out-comes of these students over 7 years, and tested them for HIV and Herpes (HSV2) after 7 years. …

  10. Expanding access to comprehensive reproductive health and HIV information and services for married adolescent girls in Nyanza Province

    Nyanza Province has been a focus of heightened attention in Kenya since the advent of the country’s HIV epidemic. …

  11. Do teenagers respond to HIV risk information? Evidence from a field experiment in Kenya

    We use a randomized experiment to test whether and what information changes teenagers' sexual behavior in Kenya. Providing information on the relative risk of HIV infection by partner's age led to a 28 percent decrease in teen pregnancy, an objective proxy for the incidence of unprotected sex. Self-reported sexual behavior data suggests substitution away from older (riskier) partners and toward same-age partners. In contrast, the official abstinence-only HIV curriculum had no impact on teen pregnancy. …

  12. Discovering the potential of girl guides: 12 peer education sessions

    The Kenya Girl Guides Association implements an integrated program on Life Skills and Peer Education in schools. Adult Guide Leaders conduct Life Skills sessions with Guides in Girl Guide Units in each participating school. Over the three terms or trimesters, 24 hours of sessions are held on 12 topics. The sessions help Girl Guides to learn about and explore the topics for themselves. Each Guide Unit has about 50 Girl Guides and four Patrol Leaders - an informed and sizeable group that can reach the rest of the school in a positive way. …

  13. Discovering the potential of girl guides in schools: a life skills curriculum for guide leaders

    From 1999 to 2006, Kenya Girl Guides Association received support from Family Health International (FHI) and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) to integrate HIV and AIDS prevention into more than 700 Guide Units in three regions: Coast, Rift Valley, and Western. From 2006 to 2009, KGGA will improve the Guide programme in the existing 366 schools and expand to more than 900 new schools (mostly at the primary level) in Coast and Rift Valley provinces, with support from FHI through the AIDS, Population, and Health Integrated Assistance (APHIA II) Program. …

  14. Youth and the Global HIV/AIDS Crisis: A Toolkit for Action

    This Tool-kit for Action has two components. In Part One, you will hear from a sample of youth and youth workers (based in Ottawa) on what prevention, education, and awareness strategies have reached them, what they think about these strategies, and their own ideas for effective youth-centred HIV/AIDS actions for their communities. Part Two looks at a range of for- and by-youth public education initiatives from Kenya, the US, South Africa, Bangladesh, and Canada. …

  15. The world starts with me!

    This is an innovative, computer-based, online curriculum on sexual and reproductive health and rights for secondary schools in Indonesia, Kenya, Thailand and Uganda. It combines information technology (IT) skills-building and creative expression with sexual health and rights (SRH) education, using experiential learning as the didactic method and following the principles of three combined approaches: adolescents' development, behaviour change and the human rights-based approach. …

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