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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Adolescent-friendly health services for adolescents living with HIV: from theory to practice; technical brief

    This technical brief will be useful to HIV programme managers in health ministries and other adolescent-related line ministries, especially those in low- and middle-income countries in sub-Saharan Africa, in implementing, monitoring and evaluating peer-based and adolescent-responsive and -friendly services for adolescents living with HIV. …

  2. Improving lives by accelerating progress towards the UN Sustainable Development Goals for adolescents living with HIV: a prospective cohort study

    Background: Low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) face major challenges in achieving the UN's Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for vulnerable adolescents. We aimed to test the UN Development Programme's proposed approach of development accelerators—provisions that lead to progress across multiple SDGs—and synergies between accelerators on achieving SDG-aligned targets in a highly vulnerable group of adolescents in South Africa. …

  3. All in, in Eastern and Southern Africa: catalysing the HIV response for adolescents

    The report demonstrates progress made on adolescent HIV programming in the Eastern and Southern African Region (ESAR) in a few short years. Qualitative in approach, the report explores how the impact of HIV on adolescents and young people was given visibility and focus as a result of the All In to end adolescent AIDS (All In) country assessments, which systematically reviewed and analyzed data, programmes and strategies currently responding to adolescent HIV.

  4. Addressing challenges facing adolescents in knowing and managing their HIV status in sub-Saharan Africa

    This policy paper was conceived at a joint LSHTM-Sentebale roundtable meeting in July 2017; three young people from Lesotho and Botswana presented their personal experiences and challenges of living with HIV to an audience including Prince Harry, leading HIV researchers, and senior staff from organisations such as UNAIDS, PEPFAR and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria. This paper profiles some promising approaches to address challenges and barriers identified by adolescents living with HIV (ALHIV). …

  5. Structural drivers and social protection: mechanisms of HIV risk and HIV prevention for South African adolescents

    Social protection is high on the HIV-prevention agenda for youth in sub-Saharan Africa. However, questions remain: How do unconditional cash transfers work? What is the effect of augmenting cash provision with social care? And can “cash plus care” social protection reduce risks for adolescents most vulnerable to infection? This study tackles these questions by first identifying mediated pathways to adolescent HIV risks and then examining potential main and moderating effects of social protection in South Africa.

  6. National HIV strategy for adolescents and young people 2016-2020

    The development of a National HIV Strategy for Adolescents and Young People is in alignment with ongoing efforts to reduce HIV infection rates in Nigeria. Efforts have been made to address issues of adolescents and young people in previous plans. …

  7. Kenya fast-track plan to end HIV and AIDS along adolescents and young people

    Goal: To fast-track the HIV response to end new HIV infections, AIDS related deaths and stigma and discrimination in adolescents and young people. Objectives of this fast-track plan: 1. To reduce new HIV infections among adolescents and young people by 40%; 2. To reduce AIDS related deaths among adolescent and young people by 15%; 3. To reduce stigma and discrimination by 25%. Target beneficiaries: The target beneficiary populations are adolescent boys and girls aged 10 – 19 years and young people, particularly women, aged 20 – 24 years. …

  8. The impact and cost of the HIV/AIDS investment framework for adolescents

    Background: In 2005, the resources needed to support orphans and vulnerable children in sub-Saharan Africa were estimated at US$1.1–4.1 billion. Approaches to support vulnerable children have changed considerably since then. This study updates previous estimates by including new types of support and information on support costs. Methods: We considered 16 types of support categorized as economic strengthening, education support, social care and community outreach, and program support. …

  9. Cash plus care: social protection cumulatively mitigates HIV-risk behaviour among adolescents in South Africa

    Objectives: It is not known whether cumulative ‘cash plus care’ interventions can reduce adolescent HIV-infection risks in sub-Saharan Africa. This study investigated whether parental AIDS and other environmental adversities increase adolescent HIVrisk behaviour and whether social protection provision of ‘cash’ or integrated ‘cash plus care’ reduces HIV-risk behaviour. Design: A prospective observational study with random sampling (<2.5% baseline refusal, 1-year follow-up, 96.8% retention). …

  10. The Government of Kenya’s Cash Transfer Program Reduces the Risk of Sexual Debut among Young People Age 15-25

    The aim of this study is to assess whether the Government of Kenya’s Cash Transfer for Orphans and Vulnerable Children (Kenya CT-OVC) can reduce the risk of HIV among young people by postponing sexual debut. The program provides an unconditional transfer of US$20 per month directly to the main caregiver in the household. An evaluation of the program was implemented in 2007–2009 in seven districts. Fourteen Locations were randomly assigned to receive the program and fourteen were assigned to a control arm. A sample of households was enrolled in the evaluation in 2007. …

  11. Child-focused state cash transfers and adolescent risk of HIV infection in South Africa: a propensity-score-matched case-control study

    Background: Effective and scalable HIV prevention for adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa is needed. Cash transfers can reduce HIV incidence through reducing risk behaviours. However, questions remain about their effectiveness within national poverty-alleviation programmes, and their effects on different behaviours in boys and girls. Methods: In this case-control study, we interviewed South African adolescents (aged 10–18 years) between 2009 and 2012. …

  12. SADC Minimum Standards for child and adolescent HIV, TB and malaria continuum of care and support (2013-2017)

    The Minimum Standards serve as a framework to guide the regional harmonisation of approaches for a continuum of care and support in HIV, TB and malaria for children and adolescents in the SADC region. This is necessary to improve the effectiveness of national and community efforts to accelerate child survival and achieve comprehensive developmental outcomes for children and adolescents. …

  13. SADC regional assessment report of policies and programmes on child and adolescent HIV, TB and malaria

    The SADC Protocol on Health stipulates that Member States should cooperate in dealing with health issues in a harmonised manner as an essential ingredient for the effective control of communicable diseases in the region notably, HIV, TB and Malaria. As part of the response, key strategic frameworks to guide action in the control of these three diseases have been developed by SADC but these mostly address the adult population. In this context, the SADC Secretariat is mandated to develop The SADC Minimum Standards for Child and Adolescent HIV, TB and Malaria Continuum of Care. …

  14. Adolescent HIV: cause for concern in Southern Africa

    There is a substantial burden of HIV infection in adolescents in southern Africa who acquired HIV perinatally. It is evident that they contribute substantially to hospital admissions and in-hospital deaths. There is an urgent need for services that will be able to provide accessible and appropriate HIV testing, counseling, and support, as well as facilitate access to ART and appropriate sexual risk-reduction interventions. …

  15. Correlates of intention to use condoms among Sub-Saharan African youth: the applicability of the theory of planned behaviour

    Aims: To test the applicability of an extended version of the theory of planned behaviour for the study of condom use intentions among large samples of young people in South Africa and Tanzania. Methods: Baseline data of a randomized controlled trial of school-based HIV/AIDS prevention programmes were used. The setting comprised secondary schools in the regions of Cape Town, Polokwane and Dar es Salaam. Participants were 15,782 secondary school students. …

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