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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Circle of life HIV/AIDS prevention for American Indian and Alaska native youth

    This article describes the objectives, theoretical bases, development process, and evaluation efforts to-date for the Circle of Life (COL) curricula, HIV/AIDS prevention interventions designed for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth. The curricula are based on Indigenous models of learning and behavior encompassing concepts of Western theories of health behavior change. The curricula underwent extensive national and community review. Subsequent advances include the development of a computer-based version of the intervention.

  2. Keys, Cards, Condoms Poster

    Got your keys? Got your cards? Got your condoms? Poster.

  3. Young, Black, Beautiful and In Control Poster

    Young, Black, Beautiful and In Control Poster. We're young, black, beautiful and In control. We decide when to have sex...and we always use a condom.

  4. Multiculturalism and AIDS: different communities mean different educational messages required

    The multitude of ethnic communities in Canada means different approaches and methods must be used for health education. Canadian AIDS educators have used a range of approaches, including an AIDS bingo game for indigenous populations in northern Manitobaáand AIDS education messages in the streets of Toronto.

  5. A Tri-Level HIV-Prevention Educational Intervention

    This paper describes an intervention designed to provide HIV education at three levels: to students in a registered nurse baccalaureate-nursing program, lay health advisors, and African Americans in high risk communities. Students conducted needs assessments and prepared teaching plans, contributed to funding proposals and implemented and evaluated their programs. Lay health workers were trained as peer educators and were drawn from the high risk community, to increase their credibility. Of the 168 community participants, 151 completed both pre and post-test HIV knowledge exams. …

  6. Addressing homophobia in relation to HIV/AIDS in aboriginal communities: final report of the environmental scan 2004-05

    Addressing Homophobia in Relation to HIV/AIDS in Aboriginal Communities (AHRHAAC) is a project of the Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network (CAAN). AHRHAAC was created to look at how organizations serving Aboriginal people can help to create supportive and nonjudgmental environments for two-spirit people living with HIV/AIDS through the development of policies that address homophobia and by raising awareness in Aboriginal communities on how to address homophobia when it is a barrier to HIV/AIDS prevention and education. …

  7. Reaching the Unreached: A Practical Guide to Producing HIV and AIDS Prevention Audio-Visual Material in Ethnic Minority Language

    The manual is designed for people who want to develop materials in ethnic minority languages but are not sure how. Explaining and giving examples of why culture and language are essential in HIV prevention, the manual offers a simple but detailed explanation of the 12-Step UNESCO Methodology for developing and creating these culturally and linguistically appropriate prevention materials such as such as radio shows, TV soap operas, comics and movies. It also outlines practical steps needed to design and produce a prevention drama in ethnic minority languages. …

  8. HIV Risk Factors among Moroccan and Turkish Same-Sex Attracted Youth in Amsterdam

    This report is the outcome of a month-long exploratory study on the main HIV risk factors among Moroccan and Turkish same-sex attracted (SSA) youth in Amsterdam. Data was obtained by way of interviews conducted with five experts, categorized as: academics, sexual and ethnic minority activists, and HIV professionals. Five main risk factors were determined: cultural differences; language barriers; stigma and taboo around sexuality and HIV within Islamic communities; socioeconomic marginalization; and lack of a positive term for same-sex sexual behavior and identity among the target group. …

  9. Issues and challenges of HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment programme in Nepal

    This paper explores some of the key issues and challenges of government HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment programme in Nepal. Providing HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment services in Nepal is associated with a number of issues and challenges which are shaped mostly on cultural and managerial issues from grass root to policy level.

  10. Gender, HIV/AIDS and the status of teachers. Report of the Third Commonwealth Teachers Research Symposium

    In February 2008 the Commonwealth Secretariat collaborated with Education International, the worldwide umbrella organisation of teachers unions, to hold the third in a series of research symposiums. Researchers from Ghana, Jamaica, Kenya, Mozambique, South Africa, the United Kingdom and Zambia met in Maputo to address the most critical human resource for the achievement of education goals - the teacher. …

  11. Gender and HIV Prevention Education in the Asia and Pacific Region

    This paper is a collection, both previously published and new, describing efforts in the Asia/Pacific region to target young women with HIV prevention health messages. It seeks to provide non-formal HIV prevention educators with information and tools that will help them understand the complexities of gender specific to the region.

  12. Share Rights-Shared Responsibilities

    The consultation was organized to explore the specific needs of ethnic minority communities in European countries for culturally and linguistically appropriate HIV/AIDS and sexual health services. Further, it aimed to develop a context for collaborative and integrated approaches towards improving and enhancing such services. …

  13. The Narrative of AIDS Among the Tonga of Zambia

    The Tonga of Southern Zambia usually refer to a traditional disease, Kahungo, when talking about AIDS. Such an association of AIDS with a traditional disease could easily be interpreted as a cultural obstacle to an understanding of AIDS and thus to a change of behaviour. However, a close investigation shows that this association is not the result of categorical thinking, but rather of narrative logic. What people are actually articulating when they associate AIDS with kahungo is a narrative about order, disorder and respect for existing rules and values of the society. …

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