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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Gender assessment of the national response to HIV/AIDS in Nigeria

    The assessment, aimed at understanding gender dynamics critical for successful implementation of HIV and AIDS programmes in Nigeria, is to complement the National Strategic Plan (NSP) 2010-2015. Findings will be used to strengthen and consolidate existing HIV and AIDS control efforts at all levels and contribute to the implementation of the NSP and PCRP (President's Comprehensive Response Plan for HIV/AIDS in Nigeria).

  2. A tool for strengthening gender-sensitive national HIV and sexual and reproductive health (SRH) monitoring and evaluation systems

    The tool is structured into four modules. Each module offers practical and concrete aids, such as checklists, examples and tables. Module 1 adapts the public health questions approach to M&E to provide users with a logical framework for monitoring and evaluating the impact of gender inequality on HIV and SRH outcomes and programme responses. Module 2 guides users in selecting indicators that help answer questions about gender inequality and HIV or SRH. Module 3 helps users to conduct gender analysis and interpret data gathered using gender sensitive indicators. …

  3. Gender tales from Africa: voices of children and women against discrimination

    The collection of these tales aims to provide relevant and experiential case studies for participants in gender-related courses in schools, colleges and universities, as well as in non-formal education settings. Most of the tales were written and tested by facilitators and learners during the annual 'Gender and Development in Southern Africa' course between 1998 and 2000. Several were also tested in a UNICEF workshop on 'Gender, Sexuality and HIV/ AIDS in Education', which was held in Malawi in July 2001. …

  4. Empower young women and adolescent girls: fast-track the end of the AIDS epidemic in Africa

    The purpose of this report is to guide regional and global advocacy and inform political dialogue over the coming year, including in the contexts of the African Union Agenda 2063 and the post-2015 sustainable development agenda. …

  5. The case for addressing gender and power in sexuality and HIV education: a comprehensive review of evaluation studies

    CONTEXT: Curriculum-based sexuality and HIV education is a mainstay of interventions to prevent STIs, HIV and unintended pregnancy among young people. Evidence links traditional gender norms, unequal power in sexual relationships and intimate partner violence with negative sexual and reproductive health outcomes. However, little attention has been paid to analyzing whether addressing gender and power in sexuality education curricula is associated with better outcomes. …

  6. Integrating gender and gender-based violence into HIV programs

    The vision of the Mozambique President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Gender-Based Violence Initiative (GBVI) is to reduce incidence of gender-based violence (GBV) and to create a social and institutional environment that protects women and girls and offers services of protection and help to survivors. A joint U.S. Government, Government of Mozambique, and civil society team led and developed the GBVI plan, which was informed by a wide stakeholder consultation held in August 2010. …

  7. Discussion paper: Cash transfers and HIV prevention

    This discussion paper synthesizes the evidence for the effectiveness of cash transfers for HIV prevention and explores implications and opportunities for advancing research and policy agendas. Much of this evidence centres on girls and young women, who bear significant HIV burdens, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, and often have less control over their sexual choices than do men. Many forms of transfers exist that may contribute to HIV prevention. …

  8. The cost and cost-effectiveness of gender-responsive interventions for HIV: a systematic review

    Introduction: Harmful gender norms and inequalities, including gender-based violence, are important structural barriers to effective HIV programming. We assess current evidence on what forms of gender-responsive intervention may enhance the effectiveness of basic HIV programmes and be cost-effective. Methods: Effective intervention models were identified from an existing evidence review (“what works for women”). Based on this, we conducted a systematic review of published and grey literature on the costs and cost-effectiveness of each intervention identified. …

  9. What HIV programs work for adolescent girls?

    Background: Adolescent girls face unique challenges in reducing their risk of acquiring HIV because of gender inequalities, but much of HIV programming and evaluation lacks a specific focus on female adolescents. Methods: This article, based on a review of 150 studies and evaluations from 2001 to June 2013, reviews evidence on programming for adolescents that is effective for girls or could be adapted to be effective for girls. Results: The evidence suggests specific interventions for adolescent girls across 3 critical areas: (1) an enabling environment, including keeping girls in school …

  10. UNAIDS gender assessment tool: Towards a gender-transformative HIV response

    The Gender assessment tool for national HIV responses is intended to assist countries assess their HIV epidemic, context and response from a gender perspective, helping them to make their HIV responses gender transformative and (as such) more effective. The Tool is specifically designed to support the development or review of national strategic plans (NSP) and to inform submissions to both country investment cases and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM).

  11. Strengthening the enabling environment for women and girls: what is the evidence in social and structural approaches in the HIV response?

    There is growing interest in expanding public health approaches that address social and structural drivers that affect the environment in which behaviour occurs. Half of those living with HIV infection are women. The sociocultural and political environment in which women live can enable or inhibit their ability to protect themselves from acquiring HIV. …

  12. Preventing sexual violence and HIV in children

    BACKGROUND: Evidence linking violence against women and HIV has grown, including on the cycle of violence and the links between violence against children and women. To create an effective response to the HIV epidemic, it is key to prevent sexual violence against children and intimate partner violence (IPV) against adolescent girls. …

  13. Inclusion of adolescent girls in HIV prevention research - an imperative for an AIDS-free generation

    Recent scientific advances centred on the use of anti-retrovirals (ARVs) – both prophylactically to prevent HIV acquisition (pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP) and for treatment to minimize onward transmission (treatment as prevention, or TasP) – have led to a new-found optimism for control of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and the possibility of creating an “AIDS-free generation”. In order to translate this optimism into reality, large and sustained reductions in incident HIV infections are required. …

  14. Know Your HIV/AIDS epidemic from a gender perspective: Rwanda Report

    Decades of research from around the world has demonstrated that gender inequality negatively affects a range of health outcomes for adults, and gender inequality has been recognized as a key driver of the worldwide HIV epidemic. Managers at the national and subnational levels need information on the intersection of gender and HIV to address gender in the planning and implementing of HIV programs. Policy makers need information on interventions that are effective in accounting for gender inequities for decision making on national and global levels. …

  15. Gender inequality and HIV transmission: a global analysis

    Introduction: The HIV pandemic disproportionately impacts young women. Worldwide, young women aged 15–24 are infected with HIV at rates twice that of young men, and young women alone account for nearly a quarter of all new HIV infections. The incommensurate HIV incidence in young – often poor – women underscores how social and economic inequalities shape the HIV epidemic. Confluent social forces, including political and gender violence, poverty, racism, and sexism impede equal access to therapies and effective care, but most of all constrain the agency of women. …

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