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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Parent-child communication about sexual and reproductive health in rural Tanzania: Implications for young people's sexual health interventions

    Background: Many programmes on young people and HIV/AIDS prevention have focused on the in-school and channeled sexual and reproductive health messages through schools with limited activities for the young people's families. The assumption has been that parents in African families do not talk about sexual and reproductive health (SRH) with their children. These approach has had limited success because of failure to factor in the young person's family context, and the influence of parents. …

  2. Saving a Generation: Ethiopian Youth Rally to Prevent HIV/AIDS

    Fassil Nebyeleul was a 21-year-old university student when AIDS claimed one of his best friends. The death shocked Fassil and his mates. They had never imagined that HIV could hit so close to home. But they knew the behavior that had led to their friend's death was no different from their own. "We decided that we were all HIV-positive and calculated our time of death as four or five years," Fassil said. "So we said, let us do something before our lives are gone." What they did was organize a group called Save Your Generation to warn other young people about the threat of HIV/AIDS. …

  3. Impact of five years of peer-mediated interventions on sexual behavior and sexually transmitted infections among female sex workers in Mombasa, Kenya

    Background: Since 2000, peer-mediated interventions among female sex workers (FSW) in Mombasa Kenya have promoted behavioural change through improving knowledge, attitudes and awareness of HIV serostatus, and aimed to prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted infection (STI) by facilitating early STI treatment. Impact of these interventions was evaluated among those who attended peer education and at the FSW population level. Methods: A pre-intervention survey in 2000, recruited 503 FSW using snowball sampling. …

  4. Evaluation of a Prevention Intervention to Reduce HIV Risk among Angolan Soldiers

    We developed and evaluated a military-focused HIV prevention intervention to enhance HIV riskreduction knowledge, motivation, and behaviors among Angolan soldiers. Twelve bases were randomly assigned to HIV prevention or control conditions, yielding 568 participants. HIV prevention participants received training in preventing HIV (4.5 days) and malaria (0.5 days). Control participants received the reverse. Monthly booster sessions were available after each intervention. We assessed participants at baseline, three and six months after the training. …

  5. Reproductive health for refugees by refugees in Guinea IV: Peer education and HIV knowledge, attitudes, and reported practices

    Peer education has long been used to promote HIV awareness and reduce risk. However, little has been written about its use in refugee settings. This study aimed to assess whether refugee peer education could improve HIV knowledge, attitudes and practices among Guinean refugees. The study also assessed whether gender, age or formal education were more strongly associated to improved HIV outcomes than peer education. Data was collected through a cross-sectional survey of 889 men and women in 23 camps throughout the Forest Region, Guinea. …

  6. Community-based HIV/AIDS education in rural Uganda: which channel is most effective?

    This analysis looks at aáprocess evaluation of four channels of delivery (drama, video, community education and leaflets) used in an Information, Education and Communication (IEC) intervention on HIV/AIDS in rural Uganda. Semi-structured interviews (n=37) and focus groups (n=3) were conducted among field staff. Two questionnaires (n=105 and n=69) and focus groups were conducted with community members. More than 85% of the community had seen at least one drama or video and saw them as relevant and realistic. However, the overall message of the plays was often not well understood. …

  7. The Social Conditions for Successful Peer Education: A Comparison of Two HIV Prevention Programs Run by Sex Workers in India and South Africa

    Peer education is increasingly being used to combat the spread of HIV and AIDS. However, results are inconsistent. This study systematically compares the context and implementation of two peer educational approaches among sex workers in India and South Africa, which had contrasting outcomes, to identify factors leading to success or failure. The Indian intervention's success was enabled by: a stable, supportive social, material and political context; and an ethos of community development which committed resources to sex worker empowerment, ownership and involvement. …

  8. Evaluation of an HIV/AIDS peer education programme in a South African workplace

    This paper describes an evaluation of a workplace HIV/AIDS peer-educational program. A cross-sectional study of 900 employees was conducted in 2001 across three areas in South Africa and measured the impact of a peer-education program on knowledge, attitudes towards people living with HIV/AIDS, perceptions of risk and condom use. Peer-education had no impact on any outcome. Some 59% of subjects had good knowledge, 62% positive attitude towards people living with HIV/AIDS, 34% reported frequently using condoms, 73% perceived themselves at low risk for infection. …

  9. Culturally-adapted and audio-technology assisted HIV/AIDS awareness and education program in rural Nigeria: a cohort study

    This prospective, 14-week cohort study sought to identify changes in HIV knowledge using a culturally-adapted, technology assisted educational approach in three rural Nigerian villages. One group of people were given seminar-based education, while another were given a portable, digial audio technology-based educational program, which drew on the rural culture of oral learning. The majority of the participants were Muslim (99%), male (53.3%) and lacked formal education (55%). HIV knowledge was improved by a larger degree in the technology facilitated group than the seminar-based group. …

  10. Fostering accurate HIV/AIDS knowledge among unmarried youths in Cameroon: Do family environment and peers matter?

    This report investigates the linkages between family structure, family and peer communication about sexuality and accurate knowledge of transmission and prevention strategies. Data from the Cameroon Family Life and Health Survey, conducted in 2002 were used. Respondents were aged 10 years and over and sampled 765 households from the 75 localities forming the administrative prefecture of Bandjoun. Details questionnaires were used to gather data for the survey and it had a 97% response rate. …

  11. Correlates of HIV knowledge and testing: Results of a 2003 South African Survey

    This research study investigated the correlation between HIV knowledge and testing. The researchers' hypothesis was that there would be significant relationships between knowledge of HIV transmission and getting tested for HIV, educational level, and gender, as well as testing and gender and knowing someone who has HIV or has died of AIDS. The study design used a convenience sample and was conducted in South Africa. 429 volunteers filled out the Carey and Shroeder Brief HIV Knowledge Questionnaire. Results indicate that as education level increased, knowledge of HIV did also. …

  12. As simple as ABC? How rural ABET Centres respond to HIV/AIDS

    This article investigates the ways in which two rural Adult Basic Education and Training (ABET) Centres in the Limpopo Province address the challenges of HIV/AIDS. Theories of social capital are used to explain the different responses of the Centres. The communities surrounding both Centres face similar structural problems of poverty, unemployment, migrancy, gender inequality, poor health and low levels of education. In one Centre, educators and learners denied that HIV/AIDS was a serious issue. …

  13. HIV/AIDS education: what African youth say is effective

    This study on HIV/AIDS-education programs was conducted with the Uganda Ministry of Education and Sports in a national sample of 76 secondary schools in Uganda. Participants included secondary students (N = 883) who critiqued their formal and informal school curricula and offered youth perspectives regarding what teaching mediums and programs of HIV/AIDS prevention are most effective. Results indicated that HIV/AIDS education is not taught in their respective school curricula. …

  14. Addressing the needs of young adolescents

    Worldwide, nearly 10 percent of people are ages 10 to 14, and in developing countries, the percentage is often higher (e.g., Uganda, 16 percent).1 Early adolescence marks a critical time of physical, developmental, and social changes. Interventions during early adolescence may be more effective in shaping healthy attitudes and behaviors than in late adolescence, when attitudes and behaviors are more established. Young adolescents are also more likely to still be in school and less likely to have begun sexual activity.

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