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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. How to develop your life skills: a self-help guide for Tanzanian youth

    This guide is composed of 8 units. Unit 1 defines life skills, Unit 2 deals with self-esteem, Unit 3 helps understand decision making, Unit 4 provides guidance on solving problems, Unit 5 focuses on communication, Unit 6 deals with emotions and stress management, Unit 7 gives instructions on goal setting, Unit 8 provides solutions to exercises.

  2. National adolescent sexual and reproductive health and rights framework strategy 2014 - 2019

    The National ASRH&R Framework Strategy on ASRH&R is based on a holistic review of the three lead documents (National Report on Factors Associated with Teenage Pregnancy in South Africa (2014), Background Resource Document on the State of ASRH&R in South Africa (2012), Report on Consultative Workshop with Stakeholders on ASRH&R (2012) discussed in section 5) which identified gaps and issues of ASRH&R that deserved further attention. …

  3. A pocket guide of youth friendly services for service providers in Botswana

    This guide seeks to assist health workers and other service providers to strengthen ASRH services to be provided and offered to young persons both male and females regardless of their status or background. It will assist health workers and other service providers to strengthen ASRH services provided to young people.

  4. What they really want to know. Developing booklets for young people on growing up and sexuality

    A large proportion of young people worldwide are sexually active, and this exposes them to the risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV, and to the risk of unintended pregnancies. In 2008, 16 million girls aged 15 to 19 gave birth and approximately 40% of these pregnancies were unintended. Young people between the ages of 15 and 24 years account for more than one third of all new HIV infections, with some 3,000 young people becoming infected with HIV each day. …

  5. HIV infection and sexual risk behaviour among youth who have experienced orphanhood: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Background: Previous research has suggested that orphaned children and adolescents might have elevated risk for HIV infection. We examined the state of evidence regarding the association between orphan status and HIV risk in studies of youth aged 24 years and younger. Methods: Using systematic review methodology, we identified 10 studies reporting data from 12 countries comparing orphaned and non-orphaned youth on HIV-related risk indicators, including HIV serostatus, other sexually transmitted infections, pregnancy and sexual behaviours. …

  6. Do teenagers respond to HIV risk information? Evidence from a field experiment in Kenya

    We use a randomized experiment to test whether and what information changes teenagers' sexual behavior in Kenya. Providing information on the relative risk of HIV infection by partner's age led to a 28 percent decrease in teen pregnancy, an objective proxy for the incidence of unprotected sex. Self-reported sexual behavior data suggests substitution away from older (riskier) partners and toward same-age partners. In contrast, the official abstinence-only HIV curriculum had no impact on teen pregnancy. …

  7. Annual Report 2006

    The Young Empowered and Healthy (Y.E.A.H) Initiative is a multi-channel communication campaign by and for young people that combines mass media, person-to-person dialogue, and community media. The mission of Y.E.A.H is to stimulate dialogue and action among communities, families, schools, and health institutions; and model positive practices through local and national media. Y.E.A.H is designed to contribute to a reduction in the incidence of HIV and early pregnancy and to contribute to an increase in the proportion of young people that complete primary education and beyond. …

  8. Addressing the needs of young adolescents

    Worldwide, nearly 10 percent of people are ages 10 to 14, and in developing countries, the percentage is often higher (e.g., Uganda, 16 percent).1 Early adolescence marks a critical time of physical, developmental, and social changes. Interventions during early adolescence may be more effective in shaping healthy attitudes and behaviors than in late adolescence, when attitudes and behaviors are more established. Young adolescents are also more likely to still be in school and less likely to have begun sexual activity.

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