• Twitter
  • RSS

UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

Search resources

The search found 21 results in 0.019 seconds.

Search results

  1. The fifth South African national HIV prevalence, incidence, behaviour and communication survey, 2017 (SABSSM V)

    The Fifth South African National HIV Prevalence, Incidence, Behaviour and Communication Survey, (SABSSM V), a population-based cross-sectional survey of households in South Africa, was designed to assess the prevalence and trends of key HIV–related indicators. The survey was conducted between January and December 2017 by the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) and provides information on national and sub-national progress toward HIV epidemic control in the country. This report summarizes the HIV epidemic and impact of South Africa’s national HIV response.

  2. Step up the pace: towards an AIDS-free generation in West and Central Africa

    The West and Central Africa region has one of the world’s highest HIV burdens among children and adolescents, second only to that of Eastern and Southern Africa. Yet, due to its lower HIV prevalence rate, the epidemic has received less attention than in other regions. …

  3. Monitoring HIV prevention programme outcomes among key populations in Kenya: findings from a national survey

    In preparation for the implementation of the Kenya AIDS Strategic Framework 2014/15- 2018/19, the Kenya National AIDS and STI Control Programme facilitated a national polling booth survey as part of a baseline assessment of HIV-related risk behaviours among female sex workers, men who have sex with men, and people who inject drugs, and their utilization of existing preventive interventions, as well as structural factors that may influence KPs’ vulnerability to HIV. …

  4. Reviewing 'emergencies' for Swaziland: Shifting the paradigm in a new era

    Swaziland is experiencing a generalized epidemic. The world's highest HIV prevalence and the increasing number of deaths due to AIDS is having unprecedented impact on Swaziland. Worryingly, with a generation of orphans and rapidly escalating poverty, this desperate situation is being accepted as "normal". HIV/AIDS in Swaziland has been characterized by a slow onset of impacts that have failed to command an emergency response. With insufficient resource allocation and a lack of capacity, slow onset events can become emergencies. Allocating humanitarian funding according to need is important. …

  5. Study of Family Planning and HIV Integrated Services in Five Countries

    In the past several years, there has been a growing international dialogue on the feasibility and desirability of providing integrated family planning (FP) and HIV services. The reasons for offering joint, complementary services are many. Adding FP services to counseling and testing might provide an opportunity to reach populations that do not typically attend FP clinics, such as the sexually active young and unmarried, men, and members of high-risk groups such as sex workers. …

  6. Are Funding Decisions Based on Performance?

    This study is a comparison of approaches as practiced by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, and the World Bank's Multi-Country AIDS Program for Africa in Mozambique, Uganda, and Zambia. To what extent do the major funders of HIV/AIDS programs in developing countries use past performance to guide decisions about future funding? …

  7. Demographic and socioeconomic patterns of HIV/AIDS prevalence in Africa

    Understanding the demographic and socioeconomic patterns of the prevalence and incidence of HIV/AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa is crucial for developing programs and policies to combat HIV/AIDS. This paper looks critically at the methods and analytical challenges to study the links between socioeconomic and demographic status and HIV/AIDS. Some of the misconceptions about the HIV/AIDS epidemic are discussed and unusual empirical evidence from the existing body of work is presented. Several important messages emerge from the results. …

  8. Levels and spread of HIV seroprevalence and associated factors: evidence from national household surveys

    This report summarizes HIV prevalence and the associations between HIV serostatus and key characteristics and behaviors of adult women and men in 22 developing countries, primarily in sub- Saharan Africa. Data come from Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) and AIDS Indicator Surveys (AIS) conducted between 2001 and 2006. In most of these surveys, nationally representative samples of women age 15-49 and men age 15-59 were tested for HIV. …

  9. Report on the management of HIV/AIDS pandemic in the public service

    This study had the following objectives: To compile a profile of the magnitude and general impact of HIV/AIDS on the public service and related attrition within public service in Tanzania; To assess the number of staff who left service with a focus on HIV/AIDS related attrition; To assess problems encountered by all levels of government in dealing with human capital planning; To assess the HIV/AIDS intervention currently in place at all levels of government, and the extent to which the government has networked with external institutions to access available services; To assess the extent to whi …

  10. Swaziland Human Development Report 2007. HIV and AIDS and culture

    The 2007 National Human Development Report seeks to provide insights on the interface between culture and contemporary society with the goal of identifying interventions that assist national stakeholders at all levels to effectively address the HIV/AIDS pandemic. It must be noted that behavior change is at the core of preventive approaches to combating the pandemic. Behaviour is to a great extent influenced by culture. …

  11. Orphans and vulnerable children in high HIV-prevalence countries in Sub-Saharan Africa

    This study provides estimates of the size and distribution of orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) in eight sub-Saharan African countries with relatively high HIV prevalence (Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zimbabwe), and assesses their situation over several dimensions including schooling and health care. The study uses data collected in recent nationally representative Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) and AIDS Indicator Surveys (AIS) that included HIV testing of adult women and men. …

  12. The Economic impact of HIV/AIDS in Botswana: Final report

    This report focuses on the economic impacts of AIDS at both macro- and micro-levels, and includes an assessment of the likely impact on the key macroeconomic variables mentioned above, as well as the fiscal impact, and the impact on households and firms. One of the key objectives of the study is to update a previous exercise, undertaken in 1999-2000, which examined the likely macroeconomic impact of HIV/AIDS (BIDPA 2000).

  13. Action for children affected by AIDS: programme profiles and lessons learned

    The publication documents lessons learned in responding to children affected by HIV/AIDS in Uganda, Zambia, Kenya, Rwanda, Thailand and the United Kingdom. It is meant for those who carry responsibility for responding to the challenges posed by HIV/AIDS, including policy-makers, programme planners and those working directly with affected individuals and families.

  14. Zimbabwe Human Development Report 2003: redirecting our responses to HIV and AIDS

    The developed and developing worlds have for a long time recognized the link between development and health. Interestingly this knowledge took a long time to be acknowledged and applied in the control of the HIV and AIDS epidemic. This is partly because of an overwhelmingly biomedical approach to the epidemic and partly because research failed to establish a clear link between development and HIV and AIDS. …

  15. The Long-run Economic Costs of AIDS: Theory and an Application to South Africa

    Most existing estimates of the macroeconomic costs of AIDS, as measured by the reduction in the growth rate of GDP, are modest. For Africa - the continent where the epidemic has hit the hardest - they range between 0.3 and 1.5 per cent annually. The reason is that these estimates are based on an underlying assumption that the main effect of increased mortality is to relieve pressure on existing land and physical capital so that output per head is little affected. …

Pages

Our mission

Supporting education ministries, researchers and practitioners through a comprehensive database, website and information service.