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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Why teach sexuality education in school ? Teacher discretion in implementing comprehensive sexuality education in rural Zambia

    Reproductive health problems such as HIV, unwanted pregnancy and unsafe abortion among adolescents are closely linked to insufficient knowledge about sexuality and reproduction and lack of access to contraceptives. Supported by international agencies, Zambia has introduced an ambitious nation-wide program for comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) to be implemented into ordinary school activities by teachers. The curriculum is firmly based in a discourse of sexual and reproductive rights, not commonly found in the public debate on sexuality in Zambia. …

  2. The Implementation of HIV/AIDS workplace programme in the Ministry of Education in Zambia

    The aim of this research is to establish the factors influencing the implementation of the Ministry of Education HIV/AIDS workplace programme in Zambia in order to provide guidelines to make it sustainable. This study is important to identify why the implementation of the workplace Programme has been difficult. This research was based on document analysis, direct observations and the use of semi structured interviews with key staff involved with the implementation of the workplace programme. …

  3. The impact of HIV/AIDS on schooling in Zambia

    Zambia is currently experiencing one of the worst HIV/AIDS epidemics in the world, one result being that between one-third and one-quarter of the children aged below 15 have lost one or both parents. The high rate of orphanhood and the demographic, economic and social effects of HIV/AIDS work synergistically to affect education in various ways. Demand is reduced. Supply and the resource base are jeopardised. A large section of the potential clientele for schooling is forced into activities that are not compatible with regular school attendance. …

  4. Pupil and teacher knowledge about HIV and AIDS in Zambia

    The Southern and Eastern Africa Consortium for Monitoring Educational Quality (SACMEQ) is a network of 15 Ministries of Education: Botswana, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Seychelles, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania (Mainland), Tanzania (Zanzibar), Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe. …

  5. The impact of the AIDS epidemic on teachers in sub-Saharan Africa: a further update

    It is still widely anticipated that the AIDS epidemic will have a devastating impact on the education sector in Africa. Faced with this impending crisis, leading experts have called for a transformation in the functioning of schools and the mainstreaming of HIV and AIDS in the education sector supported by donors. Numerous reports and articles state that the number of teachers dying from AIDS-related illnesses continues to increase very rapidly and that this is causing serious shortages of teachers. This article updates the figures that are known in that field.

  6. Courage and hope: stories from teachers living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa

    It is estimated that there are currently around 122,000 teachers in sub- Saharan Africa who are living with HIV, the vast majority of whom have not sought testing and do not know their HIV status. Stigma remains the greatest challenge and the major barrier to accessing and providing assistance to these teachers. The personal experiences from the 12 teachers presented in this book offer first-hand accounts of the difficult, and sometimes debilitating, challenges faced by teachers living with HIV. …

  7. Teacher shocks and student learning: evidence from Zambia

    A large literature examines the link between shocks to households and the educational attainment of children.We use new data to estimate the impact of shocks to teachers on student learning in Mathematics and English. Using absenteeism in the 30 days preceding the survey as a measure of these shocks we find large impacts: A 5-percent increase in the teacher's absence rate reduces learning by 4 to 8 percent of average gains over the year. …

  8. Exploring the Implications of the HIV/AIDS Epidemic for Educational Planning in Selected African Countries: The Demographic Question

    This analysis is based on applications of the AIDS Impact Model (AIM). At least two alternative population projections are used for each country (Zimbabwe, Zambia, Kenya and Uganda). The first projection is hypothetical and assumes that the HIV/AIDS epidemic never existed. Each of these projectionsis designated "Without AIDS" projection, for example, Uganda-Without AIDS. The second projection for each of the four countries traces the historical development of the epidemic as closely as possible and then projects forward to 2010. …

  9. Disease, HIV/AIDS and capacity implications: a case of the public education sector in Zambia

    This report presents findings of a study carried out to assess capacity issues in the context of the increasing incidence of disease in general and HIV/AIDS in particular on the public education sector. The first part of the report presents findings from the systems level. Here, economic conditions, the policy and institutional framework and human resource development as they relate to sector capacity are discussed. Thereafter, a sector review on the morbidity and mortality situation is outlined. …

  10. Analysing the response of a teacher training institution to HIV and AIDS: a case study from Zambia

    This study sought to examine the extent to which a teacher training institution in Zambia was able to address the problem of HIV and AIDS. The report contributes to existing knowledge in the field by using a qualitative in-depth case study approach of a single teacher training college located in a high prevalence province of Zambia. It offers insight into the response through an examination of current policy and practice at both the ministerial and institutional level. …

  11. African Higher Education Institutions Responding to the HIV/AIDS Pandemic

    The paper examines the situation of HIV/AIDS globally, and in Africa. Up to recently higher education institutions had done very little in terms of response to the pandemic. The Kelly report (Kelly 2001) as well as reports from workshops sponsored by the Association of Commonwealth Universities (ACU) and the South African Vice Chancellors' Association (SAUVCA) indicate the serious impact of the pandemic in terms of the fiscal situation, and in terms of the negative social impacts on university communities. …

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