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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. The hidden dimension: experience of self-stigma among young men who have sex with men and young transgender women and the linkages to HIV in Asia and the Pacific

    MSM and transgender people requires addressing self-issues and the linkages with HIV vulnerability and risk behavior. Yet to date, many HIV-related programs in Asia have failed to address self-stigma. To better understand how self-stigma relates to HIV, YVC undertook an in-person consultation in October 2012 in Bangkok, Thailand, and commissioned in-country research in 10 countries: Cambodia, China, Indonesia, Laos, Mongolia, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Vietnam. …

  2. Integrating a youth-based stigma and discrimination reduction curriculum in higher education: St Xavier’s College

    Stigmatizing attitudes towards people living with HIV (PLHIV) are common among young people. Yet there are few opportunities for youth to be exposed to interventions that address the key drivers of stigma and discrimination, namely lack of awareness of stigma and its harmful consequences, social judgment and fear of infection through casual contact. This project demonstrated that higher education can be an effective entry point for stigma reduction, by working with several groups and environments, in this case the faculty, students and college. …

  3. Overlooked and at Risk: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Youth in the Caribbean

    As long as criminalization of homosexuality and stigma, discrimination and violence against LGBT individuals continues in the Caribbean, the emotional and physical health of LGBT young people is at risk. All young people have the right to be treated equally under the law and to live free of discrimination and harassment. Organizations, governments, and individuals must work toward full acceptance and recognition of LGBT people, including young people.

  4. Do stigma, blame and stereotyping contribute to unsafe sexual behaviour? A test of claims about the spread of HIV/AIDS arising from social representation theory and the AIDS risk reduction model

    In the context of social representation theory and the AIDS risk reduction model, it has been claimed that stigmatizing, blaming and stereotyping attitudes make people feel less at risk of contracting HIV/AIDS, and that this, in turn, results in them taking fewer precautions in their sexual behaviour. Previous research has failed to provide convincing evidence to support these claims. The present study provided a test of the claims that addressed some of the methodological issues identified in the earlier research. …

  5. We are all in the same boat! Using art and creativity approaches with young people to tackle hiv-related stigma

    This toolkit is a set of ideas on how to use art and creative approaches to build a new understanding about HIV stigma and human rights, and on how young people can work together to challenge stigma and discrimination. The toolkit uses different art forms and creative activities - drama and role playing, games, drumming, dance, puppets, story telling, pictures, drawing and collages - to spark new thinking about HIV stigma, change attitudes and challenge young people to do something. …

  6. Promoting young people's sexual and reproductive health: stigma, discrimination and human rights

    In 1999, the UK Department for International Development (DfID) funded a major programme of research into young people's sexual and reproductive health in poorer country settings.Coordinated jointly by the Centre for Sexual Health Research at the University of Southampton, the Thomas Coram Research Unit at the Institute of Education, University of London and the Centre for Population Studies at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, the principal objectives of the Safe Passages to Adulthood programme are to: - fill key knowledge gaps relating to the nature, magnitude and consequen …

  7. The role of stigma and discrimination in increasing the vulnerability of children and youth with and affected by HIV/AIDS

    This report clearly illustrates the powerful and negative effects of stigma on those affected by HIV/AIDS. The stories from children are particularly powerful and impacting. This report aims to put across the message that combating HIV/AIDS requires a strong and coordinated reponse from all sectors of society.

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