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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Education, HIV, and early fertility: experimental evidence from Kenya

    A seven-year randomized evaluation suggests education subsidies reduce adolescent girls’ dropout, pregnancy, and marriage but not sexually transmitted infection (STI). The government’s HIV curriculum, which stresses abstinence until marriage, does not reduce pregnancy or STI. Both programs combined reduce STI more, but cut dropout and pregnancy less, than education subsidies alone. …

  2. Education, HIV, and early fertility: experimental evidence from Kenya

    We provide experimental evidence on the relationships between education, HIV/AIDS education, risky behavior and early fertility in Kenya. We exploit randomly assigned variation in the cost of schooling and in exposure to the national HIV/AIDS prevention curriculum for a cohort of over 19,000 adolescents in Western Kenya, originally aged 13.5 on average. We collected data on the schooling, marriage, and fertility out-comes of these students over 7 years, and tested them for HIV and Herpes (HSV2) after 7 years. …

  3. Impact of HIV/AIDS education programmes on sexual behaviour of female students in Nigerian schools: Policy implications for scientific and technolgical development

    This study investigated the impact of HIV/AIDS education programmes on sexual behaviors of female students in senior secondary schools in Rivers State of Nigeria. The population for the study comprised of all senior secondary schools female students in Nigeria, which was divided into urban and rural schools. The sample size was 200 female students obtained by using stratified random sampling technique. …

  4. Education and vulnerability: the role of schools in protecting young women and girls from HIV in southern Africa

    Education has a potentially important role to play in tackling the spread of HIV, but is there evidence that this potential is realized? This analysis combines the results of previous literature reviews and updates them with the findings of recent randomized controlled trials and a discussion of possible mechanisms for the effect of schooling on vulnerability to HIV infection. There is a growing body of evidence that keeping girls in school reduces their risk of contracting HIV. …

  5. Comparison of Health Education and STD Risk Reduction Interventions for Incarcerated Adolescent Females

    Adolescent girls imprisoned in state reformatories were recruited (N=246) to an 18-month health education or HIV prevention program. A randomized block design was used to assign girls to one of the two programs. Girls in the HIV prevention program had improved risk reduction and condom use skills. At 9 months of follow-up, girls in both groups reported less sex under the influence of alcohol or drugs and less unprotected sex.

  6. Research dossier: HIV prevention for girls and young women in Kenya

    This Research Dossier supports the Report Card on HIV Prevention for Girls and Young Women in Kenya produced by the United Nations Global Coalition on Women and AIDS (GCWA). It documents the detailed research coordinated for the GCWA by the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), with the support of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), United Nations Program on AIDS (UNAIDS) and Young Positives. The Report Card provides an "at a glance" summary of the current status of HIV prevention strategies and services for girls and young women in Kenya. …

  7. Knowledge and attitudes toward AIDS among female college students in Nagasaki, Japan

    This study assesses knowledge and attitudes concerning HIV infection and individuals with AIDS among 383 female students attending colleges in Nagasaki, Japan. A structured questionnaire containing questions concerning knowledge about AIDS, sources of information, beliefs and attitudes toward people with HIV/AIDS was administered during sessions set up for that purpose. The mean age of participants was 18.8 ± 0.8 years (± SD). The main source of information for AIDS awareness as reported by the students was the mass media. …

  8. What works for women and girls: evidence for HIV/AIDS interventions

    The purpose of www.whatworksforwomen.org is to compile and summarize the base of evidence to support successful interventions in HIV programming for women and girls. National AIDS programs, government ministries, implementing partners, donors, civil society groups and others need an easy-to-understand format for identifying what works for women. …

  9. Sexual and Reproductive Health of Young People: Expanding the Research and Program Agenda

    This paper's focuses on areas of relatively poorly addressed or understood aspects of young people's sexual and reproductive health. The authors propose to argue for the need to supplement our knowledge and programmatic interventions with regard to three specific issues related to young people's lives that need attention: (a) an overlooked sub-population of married adolescent girls; (b) an overlooked behavior of sex without consent; (c) programmatic interventions that work (or do not) in enhancing young people's health and development.

  10. The short-term impacts of a schooling conditional cash transfer program on the sexual behaviour of young women

    Recent evidence suggests that conditional cash transfer programs for schooling are effective in raising school enrollment and attendance. However, there is also reason to believe that such programs can affect other outcomes, such as the sexual behavior of their young beneficiaries. Zomba Cash Transfer Program is a randomized, ongoing conditional cash transfer intervention targeting young women in Malawi that provides incentives (in the form of school fees and cash transfers) to current schoolgirls and recent dropouts to stay in or return to school. …

  11. The impact of HIV/AIDS on the schooling of female students in Addis Ababa

    In Ethiopia, in 2003, 2.9 million adults and 250 000 children are living with HIV/AIDS. About 90% of the reported AIDS cases are between the age 20 and 49 and this age group is among the productive sector. However, research has revealed (UNESCO Prospect Vol. XXXIII No. 2 June, 2002) that education about sex, AIDS and health in general particularly with children and young people, does not result in increased sexual activity but, on the contrary, leads to protective behaviour. The objectives of this study are as follows: 1. …

  12. HIV/AIDS and girls' education. The FAWE Kenya Experience

    This paper tells about an experience in Kenyan primary schools. A training workshop was organized for 64 teachers, two each from the 32 targeted primary schools. The two teachers subsequently served as patrons of the peer counselling clubs in their schools and provide guidance and counselling services. Through a highly participatory workshop, the teachers were equipped with knowledge, skills and attitudes in HIV/AIDS counselling and were presented with a lot of resource material for use in their schools. …

  13. Girls, HIV and AIDS and education

    This document was developed under a joint project between UNICEF and The Global Coalition on Women and AIDS. It provides graphic and tabular evidence which link sexual knowledge/behaviours to the educational level among young people. It outlines three priorities that support schools in protecting girls and mitigating the impact of HIV and AIDS, which are: getting and keeping girls in school, providing life-skills based education; and protecting girls from gender-based school violence. …

  14. Female sex worker HIV prevention projects: lessons learnt from Papua New Guinea, India and Bangladesh

    The importance of designing and implementing successful targeted interventions for sex workers as part of HIV prevention and control cannot be over-emphasised. In almost every country, sex workers comprise a focal point of the epidemic. They are the victims of discrimination, often violently intense, trafficking, legal persecution and societal ambivalence as well as one of the first occupational groups to become heavily infected. The infection passes from sex workers back to their clients and into the general population of women, men and children. One of the clearest public health lessons emerging from the HIV pandemic is that protecting the human rights of sex workers is an important means of prevention.

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