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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. The case for addressing gender and power in sexuality and HIV education: a comprehensive review of evaluation studies

    CONTEXT: Curriculum-based sexuality and HIV education is a mainstay of interventions to prevent STIs, HIV and unintended pregnancy among young people. Evidence links traditional gender norms, unequal power in sexual relationships and intimate partner violence with negative sexual and reproductive health outcomes. However, little attention has been paid to analyzing whether addressing gender and power in sexuality education curricula is associated with better outcomes. …

  2. Gender-based violence and HIV: A review of the policy and legislative context in Southern and Eastern Africa

    This paper provides an analysis of the broad policy and legislative context for gender-based violence in the context of HIV across the 20 countries in southern and eastern Africa.

  3. Spotlight on Gender: Evidence-Based Approaches to Protecting Adolescent Girls at Risk of HIV

    Despite decades of investment in HIV prevention, a large and vulnerable population—that of adolescent girls—remains invisible, underserved, and at disproportionate risk of HIV. Given the changing shape of the epidemic and the leveling off or shrinking of resources, there is an urgent need to rebalance HIV investments between treatment and prevention and to develop evidence-based approaches for protecting the large and vulnerable populations of adolescent girls who remain at risk of HIV. This paper outlines a stepwise engagement process for improving girls’ lives and reducing their HIV risk.

  4. Gender and Sexuality/HIV Education

    Sex/HIV education curricula have disparate effects for females and males. Review of 59 rigorous sex ed evaluations from the U.S. and developing countries. After omitting single sex programs, programs with no effect, and programs that changed only knowledge, 38 remained (25 U.S. and 13 developing country). A third of these failed to disaggregate results by gender, leaving 25. This article looks at why this is the case and how gender affects SRH outcomes.

  5. Integrating gender into HIV/AIDS programmes: a review paper

    In order to update and build upon the UNAIDS effort, the World Health Organization (WHO) has identified the need to develop a set of guidelines to help national level HIV/AIDS programme planners and managers integrate gender-based issues and needs comprehensively within HIV/AIDS policies and programmes. These guidelines are intended to go beyond the "what" and the "why" to the "how" by providing a comprehensive framework for addressing gender in our response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. To initiate the drafting of the guidelines, WHO held an Expert Consultation in Geneva in June 2002. …

  6. What works for women and girls: evidence for HIV/AIDS interventions

    The purpose of www.whatworksforwomen.org is to compile and summarize the base of evidence to support successful interventions in HIV programming for women and girls. National AIDS programs, government ministries, implementing partners, donors, civil society groups and others need an easy-to-understand format for identifying what works for women. …

  7. Assessing the Integration of gender and Human Rights in HIV Related Documents and Processes in Selected Southern African Countries. A rapid assessment

    This report presents the findings of a desk study undertaken to assess the integration of gender and human rights in HIV-related documents and processes in Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. It highlights best practices, lessons learned, and areas for future action. The report implies an urgency to move from the status quo, whereby the centrality of gender equality and human rights in the pandemic regionally is underestimated. …

  8. Women and Men. Together for HIV/AIDS Prevention. Literacy, Gender and HIV/AIDS

    The stereotyping of men and women reinforces unequal sexual practice; a vision of women as weak, innocent, passive and submissive while men are strong, virile, possessive and authoritative is conducive to rape and violence. The role of superstitious beliefs is an important factor; these generally take from women in various ways their right of choice and power of decision over their bodies.The special problems of living with HIV occur in all societies; the responsibility for honesty in sexual relations and proper care of sufferers. …

  9. Gender and HIV/AIDS: supporting resources collection

    This document contains: Summaries of key resources outlining why gender is so important in understanding the impact and spread of HIV/AIDS; Practical examples of approaches from around the world, aiming to strengthen capacity building, advocacy, service delivery, and research; Short summaries of operational toolkits and guides; Information about courses, web sites, networking and contact details for organisations from around the world specialising in gender and HIV/AIDS.

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