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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Girls Speak: A New Voice in Global Development

    Girls Speak: A New Voice in Global Development is part of a series of reports on investing in adolescent girls in the developing world. This report examines qualitative data on what girls say about their aspirations across different settings and contexts. From a girl's perspective, policies and programs need to address the harmful social norms that constrain her role and opportunities in society, and provide a greater vision for her life. In their own words, girls are saying that the context and environment that shapes their lives - how they live and what they aspire to - must be addressed. …

  2. Integrating Multiple Gender Strategies to Improve HIV and AIDS interventions: A Compendium of programs in Africa

    The public health and international development communities have known for nearly two decades that gender - the way in which societies define acceptable roles, responsibilities, and behaviors of women and men - strongly influences how HIV spreads and how people respond to the epidemic. Because of the interrelated factors that contribute to HIV infection, there is growing recognition that using multiple approaches in HIV and AIDS programming is more effective than single strategies. …

  3. How to integrate gender into HIV/AIDS programs using lessons learned from USAID and partner organisations

    Of the estimated 42 million people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) at the end of 2002, 19.2 million-or about 45 percent-were women (UNAIDS and World Health Organization [WHO], 2002). In many countries around the world, the majority of new infections are occurring in women, particularly adolescents and young adults. …

  4. Has learning become taboo and is risk-taking compulsory for Caribbean boys? Researching the relationship between masculinities, education and HIV

    In recent years, gender dynamics in education in the English-speaking Caribbean have undergone significant shifts. On the one hand, educational access, retention and attainment by girls have improved significantly and should be celebrated. On the other hand, retention, completion and attainment by boys appear to be slipping. The question at the centre of these changes is whether the decline for boys is relative (boys only appear to be declining because girls are doing so much better) or real (fewer boys are reaching their potential than was the case in the past). …

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