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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Intervention and results of combating school-related gender-based violence in Democratic Republic of Congo

    This powerpoint presents the outcome of a project which aimed to promote positive social and gender norms to prevent and mitigate SRGBV in Katanga Province, DRC. …

  2. Boys are more vulnerable than girls to school-related gender-based violence: results from a survey in Zambia

    In Zambia, 47% percent of women aged 15-49 have ever experienced physical violence & 15% experienced sexual and/or gender-based violence (DHS 2007). School-related gender-based violence (SRGBV) is a global problem with serious implications for individual and population health and education outcomes. SRGBV results in sexual, physical, or psychological harm to girls and boys. SRGBV may include any form of violence or abuse based on gendered stereotypes or that targets students on the basis of their sex. …

  3. Victimes de l'école : les violences de genre en milieu scolaire, obstacles au droit des filles et des garçons à l’éducation

    Deuxième volet d’une série consacrée aux principaux freins à l’éducation des filles, ce rapport met en lumière les multiples défis à relever et dévoile différentes méthodes d’intervention utilisées par Plan International et ses partenaires pour lutter contre les violences de genre en milieu scolaire. Fondées sur les études et programmes réalisés par Plan International et ses partenaires, des recommandations sont illustrées par des cas concrets puisés dans différents pays d’intervention, en particulier dans la sous-région d’Afrique de l’Ouest et en Asie. …

  4. Doing harm in the name of protection: menstruation as a topic for sex education

    Pubertal changes in girls and boys are treated differently in school materials in New Zealand. Girls are taught about menstruation in a scientific manner oriented towards reproduction, hygiene and personal stress. Boys receive more positive information about 'exciting' and 'powerful' bodily changes which they can enjoy. The picture of growing up which girls receive is relatively bleak, and is out of touch with the realities of their own lives and those of adult women around them. …

  5. Piecing it together for women and girls. The gender dimensions of HIV-related stigma: evidence from Bangladesh, the Dominican Republic and Ethiopia

    This report focuses on the gender dimensions of HIV-related stigma. It aims to fill a gap and advance a more nuanced understanding and more effective advocacy on how stigma affects women and girls living with HIV more, less or differently to men and boys. This is an advocacy tool for use by relevant stakeholders - from international donors to global policy makers, national governments, programme managers, civil society and people living with HIV. …

  6. Can economic empowerment reduce vulnerability of girls and young women to HIV? Emerging insights

    Girls and young women are disproportionately affected by both poverty and HIV. Donors, policymakers, researchers and program implementers are exploring economic empowerment programs as a strategy to improve the health and economic status of girls and young women. But the linkages between economic status and HIV status are complex, and the role that economic approaches play in preventing HIV infection and mitigating its impact is unproven. …

  7. Les filles: guide du corps féminin - Les garçons: guide du corps masculin

    Les filles: guide du corps féminin - Les garçons: guide du corps masculin est un petit guide édité par l'association mauricienne Prévention, Information et Lutte contre le Sida en 2008. Il s'adresse aux filles et aux garçons en période de puberté et vise à leur fournir, au moyen d'un langage simple et avec de nombreuses illustrations, les réponses aux questions relatives aux changements corporelles, à la santé ou encore à la sexualité qu'ils se posent souvent à cet âge. …

  8. Girl power: the impact of girls' education on HIV and sexual behaviour

    Girl Power shows that, early in the epidemic (before 1995), more highly educated women were more vulnerable to HIV than women who were less well educated. The most likely reason is that more highly educated people had better economic prospects, which influenced their lifestyle choices such as mobility and number of sexual partners. At that stage, there was also a general information vacuum about HIV and AIDS in Africa.However, as the epidemic has evolved, the relationship between girls' education and HIV has also changed. …

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