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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Intervention and results of combating school-related gender-based violence in Democratic Republic of Congo

    This powerpoint presents the outcome of a project which aimed to promote positive social and gender norms to prevent and mitigate SRGBV in Katanga Province, DRC. …

  2. Boys are more vulnerable than girls to school-related gender-based violence: results from a survey in Zambia

    In Zambia, 47% percent of women aged 15-49 have ever experienced physical violence & 15% experienced sexual and/or gender-based violence (DHS 2007). School-related gender-based violence (SRGBV) is a global problem with serious implications for individual and population health and education outcomes. SRGBV results in sexual, physical, or psychological harm to girls and boys. SRGBV may include any form of violence or abuse based on gendered stereotypes or that targets students on the basis of their sex. …

  3. Doing harm in the name of protection: menstruation as a topic for sex education

    Pubertal changes in girls and boys are treated differently in school materials in New Zealand. Girls are taught about menstruation in a scientific manner oriented towards reproduction, hygiene and personal stress. Boys receive more positive information about 'exciting' and 'powerful' bodily changes which they can enjoy. The picture of growing up which girls receive is relatively bleak, and is out of touch with the realities of their own lives and those of adult women around them. …

  4. Piecing it together for women and girls. The gender dimensions of HIV-related stigma: evidence from Bangladesh, the Dominican Republic and Ethiopia

    This report focuses on the gender dimensions of HIV-related stigma. It aims to fill a gap and advance a more nuanced understanding and more effective advocacy on how stigma affects women and girls living with HIV more, less or differently to men and boys. This is an advocacy tool for use by relevant stakeholders - from international donors to global policy makers, national governments, programme managers, civil society and people living with HIV. …

  5. Can economic empowerment reduce vulnerability of girls and young women to HIV? Emerging insights

    Girls and young women are disproportionately affected by both poverty and HIV. Donors, policymakers, researchers and program implementers are exploring economic empowerment programs as a strategy to improve the health and economic status of girls and young women. But the linkages between economic status and HIV status are complex, and the role that economic approaches play in preventing HIV infection and mitigating its impact is unproven. …

  6. Women's empowerment and reproductive health : links throughout the life cycle

    After describing the international consensus reached in Beijing about empowering women and ending gender inequality, and defining key human rights concepts, the report examines key issues related to reproductive health and rights that affect women throughout their lives. Topics covered include: Early life chances, The mutual relationship between reproductive health and education, Adolescence and the transition to adulthood, Marriage and the family, Labour force participation and employment, Reproductive health and violence and Issues affecting the health of older women

  7. Girls, women and HIV/AIDS in eastern Africa

    A desk review based on studying available literature on girls, women and HIV/AIDS in eastern Africa. This study focuses on girls, women and HIV/AIDS in Eastern African Region. It covers Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, Sudan, Rwanda and Burundi. The focus of the study was to get a comprehensive understanding of the issues of girls, women and HIV/AIDS in the region. It is also a contribution of UNICEF ESAR in the review of the status of women, girls and HIV/AIDS ten years since the Beijing Conference. …

  8. Girl power: the impact of girls' education on HIV and sexual behaviour

    Girl Power shows that, early in the epidemic (before 1995), more highly educated women were more vulnerable to HIV than women who were less well educated. The most likely reason is that more highly educated people had better economic prospects, which influenced their lifestyle choices such as mobility and number of sexual partners. At that stage, there was also a general information vacuum about HIV and AIDS in Africa.However, as the epidemic has evolved, the relationship between girls' education and HIV has also changed. …

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