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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Piecing it together for women and girls. The gender dimensions of HIV-related stigma: evidence from Bangladesh, the Dominican Republic and Ethiopia

    This report focuses on the gender dimensions of HIV-related stigma. It aims to fill a gap and advance a more nuanced understanding and more effective advocacy on how stigma affects women and girls living with HIV more, less or differently to men and boys. This is an advocacy tool for use by relevant stakeholders - from international donors to global policy makers, national governments, programme managers, civil society and people living with HIV. …

  2. Evolving Men: Initial Results from the International Men and Gender Equality Survey (IMAGES)

    This report summarizes multi-country findings from the International Men and Gender Equality Survey (IMAGES), a comprehensive household questionnaire on men's attitudes and practices - along with women's opinions and reports of men's practices - on a wide variety of topics related to gender equality. From 2009 to 2010, household surveys were administered to more than 8,000 men and 3,500 women ages 18 to 59 in Brazil, Chile, Croatia, India, Mexico and Rwanda. …

  3. Men are changing. Case study evidence on work with men and boys to promote gender equality and positive masculinities

    Men are changing. Case study evidence on work with men and boys to promote gender equality and positive masculinities is a document that aims to strengthen and broaden the evidence base on working with men and boys. It describes and analyzes 12 programmes from around the world that sought to alter the attitudes and behaviours of men in relation to sexuality, sexual and reproductive health, violence and relationships. …

  4. Has learning become taboo and is risk-taking compulsory for Caribbean boys? Researching the relationship between masculinities, education and HIV

    In recent years, gender dynamics in education in the English-speaking Caribbean have undergone significant shifts. On the one hand, educational access, retention and attainment by girls have improved significantly and should be celebrated. On the other hand, retention, completion and attainment by boys appear to be slipping. The question at the centre of these changes is whether the decline for boys is relative (boys only appear to be declining because girls are doing so much better) or real (fewer boys are reaching their potential than was the case in the past). …

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