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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Are there any disparities between girls and boys in the response of the education sector to HIV and AIDS? Assessment of educational HIV/AIDS prevention programmes applied by SACMEQ III countries

    This paper aims to assess whether the goals of the in-school programmes on prevention of HIV and AIDS that are taught in primary schools of 15 national ministries of education in Southern and Eastern Africa have been reached equitably between boys and girls by the end of primary education. One feature of most of these ministries is that they are in countries that are the hardest hit by a general HIV epidemic. More specifically, the paper aims to analyse schoolboys’ and schoolgirls’ general knowledge about HIV and AIDS. …

  2. Good policy and practice in HIV and health education. Booklet 7: Gender equality, HIV and education

    Education, HIV and gender equality are deeply inter related aspects of personal and global development. This booklet presents new thinking and emerging research alongside a series of case studies and examples of new and time-tested programmes on the issues of gender equality, HIV and education and the interrelation between them. It includes discussion papers, which explore issues and emerging evidence in greater depth, as well as case study examples of programmes and interventions from a range of countries. …

  3. Prevention of HIV/AIDS among young people in Bangladesh: improving access to life skills based sexual and reproductive health education and condom services for male youth

    Around the world youth often do not have access to basic sexual and reproductive health (SRH) information, skills in negotiating sexual relationships and access to affordable confidential SRH services. They lack proper knowledge about their own or their partners' sexuality, communicate very little about sex in their relationships, and believe in numerous sexual myths. In Bangladesh, youth aged 15-24 years represent approximately one-sixth (23 million) of the total population. …

  4. Quasi-experimental evaluation of a national primary school HIV intervention in Kenya

    This study examined the impact of a primary-school HIV education initiative on the knowledge, self-efficacy and sexual and condom use activities of upper primary-school pupils in Kenya. …

  5. Mortality, mobility, and schooling outcomes among orphans. Evidence from Malawi

    More than 30 percent of school-aged children have lost at least one parent in Malawi. Lack of investments in human capital and adverse conditions during childhood are often associated with lower living standards in the future. Therefore, if orphans face an increased risk of poverty, exploitation, malnutrition, and poorer access to health care and schooling, early intervention is critical so as to avoid the potential poverty trap. …

  6. Reaching young men and boys

    This article highlights the needs of adolescent males as they go through a critical process of forming self-identity. A variety of educational approaches, community-based, school-based and peer education are described so as to inform young men about STDs and HIV/AIDS. Innovative strategies including social marketing, hotlines and radio call-in programmes; the internet and CD-ROMs and entertainment-education programmes that provide adolescent males the confidential, timely and anonymous counselling they tend to prefer are discussed. …

  7. Partners for change: enlisting men in HIV/AIDS prevention

    Efforts to include men and boys in sexual and reproductive health policies and programmes have intensified worldwide in response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Condoms, long promoted as protection from unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, have become a focus of HIV/AIDS campaigns in many countries. HIV/AIDS has also called attention to the imbalance of power between women and men. People are questioning widely held cultural beliefs and attitudes about masculinity that contribute to situations of risk and make it easier for the virus to spread.

  8. Has learning become taboo and is risk-taking compulsory for Caribbean boys? Researching the relationship between masculinities, education and HIV

    In recent years, gender dynamics in education in the English-speaking Caribbean have undergone significant shifts. On the one hand, educational access, retention and attainment by girls have improved significantly and should be celebrated. On the other hand, retention, completion and attainment by boys appear to be slipping. The question at the centre of these changes is whether the decline for boys is relative (boys only appear to be declining because girls are doing so much better) or real (fewer boys are reaching their potential than was the case in the past). …

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