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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. A future of possibilities: Educating children living in HIV impacted households

    Close to one and a half million Kenyans reportedly live with HIV/AIDS. Using qualitative in-depth interviews this study explores the ways in which parents living with HIV/AIDS navigate their social and economic environment to provide educational opportunities for their children. Barriers identified include the economic costs of a free primary education, and the emotional implications of living in an HIV affected household. Respondents demonstrate a persistent utilization of internal and external resources in navigating these barriers. …

  2. Rethinking HIV/AIDS in South Africa: has the response been overmedicalized?

    This paper examines the potential impact of HIV/AIDS on different levels of South African society (individual, household, and national) over time. Using differences in demographic projections to guide the analysis, the prospective implications of HIV/AIDS on households, society, economy and nation are discussed and issues that could influence or mitigate those possible impacts are examined. …

  3. South African national HIV prevalence, incidence, behaviour and communication survey, 2008: the health of our children

    The main rationale for this study was to better understand the health status of South African children in relation to HIV. Children have not been adequately included in national health surveys such as the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and this study allowed for the assessment of progress towards the realisation of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and the attainment of the National Strategic Plan targets in South Africa. …

  4. Assessment of the socio-economic impact of HIV and AIDS on key sectors in Kenya

    The report shows that HIV and AIDS has varied and far reaching socio-economic impacts to the persons infected and affected and to the economy in general. These effects cannot be ignored in any of the sectors and the economy as a whole, if national and millennium development goals are to be achieved. HIV and AIDS has the greatest effect on people in their prime years of economic productivity, and is uniquely devastating as it increases poverty and reverses human development achievements. …

  5. The Socio-economic Impact of HIV/AIDS on Children in a Low Prevalence Context: the case of Senegal

    This chapter analyses the socio-economic impacts of HIV/AIDS on children in Senegal as well as the response policies implemented by the differnt actors. Data were collected at seven research sites across the country and complemented by a review of available reports and articles. Their analysis reveals an insignificant nationwide impact of HIV/AIDS in sectors of health, education, demography and economy.

  6. The Impact of a Growing HIV/AIDS Epidemic on the Kenyan Children

    This document gives an overview of the impact of HIV/AIDS on children in Kenya as well as looking at HIV/AIDS interventions. The results presented in this chapter are based on secondary data from relevant institutions, three mini surveys and simulation models. The analysis shows that prevention programmes implemented so far have not been very effective in changing risky behaviours. Data from ministries suggest a slight decline in the quantity of education services and that health services are being overwhelmed by HIV/AIDS patients.

  7. The Effect of Orphanhood on Primary School Attendance Reconsidered: the power of female-headed households in Tanzania. Project Results Workshop, University of Dar es Salaam, 10-12 March, 2003

    The common presumption that orphans are less likely to attend school than non-orphans is re-examined using survey data from two regions in Tanzania. It is argued that orphans should not be compared simply with non-orphans since there are other vulnerable groups of children. Further, with particular reference to place of residence, it is argued that orphans should not be viewed as a homogeneous group. …

  8. Predicting the social consequences of orphanhood in South Africa

    This paper examines and questions the predictions found in the academic and policy literature of social breakdown in Southern Africa in the wake of anticipated high rates of orphanhood caused by the AIDS epidemic. Analysis of the logic underlying these predictions reveals four causal relationships necessary to fulfil such dramatic and apocalyptic predictions:1. High AIDS mortality rates will produce high numbers of orphans.2. These orphans will become children who do not live in appropriate social environments to equip them for adult citizenship.3. …

  9. HIV/AIDS, Lagging Policy Response and Impact on Children: the case of Côte d'Ivoire

    The broad objective of this study is to determine the impact of HIV/AIDS on the child's well-being with a view to identifying the appropriate methods for mitigating these effects and finding objective arguments for making a case for urgent action.These objectives will be met by collecting secondary data though a review of existing documents on the subject on one part and by collecting primary data by a series of field interviews on the other hand. …

  10. Contrasting Primary School Outcomes of Paternal and Maternal Orphans in Manicaland, Zimbabwe

    Fewer orphans are enrolled in school than other children but the extent of disadvantage-after allowing for their older average age- is small in most countries. Crosscountry analyses show variation in the size and strength of associations between orphanhood and education according to the form of parental loss experienced. However, maternal death is usually more detrimental to children's education chances than paternal death and double orphans are typically the least likely to be in school. These differences are not fully accounted for by differences in household socio-economic circumstances. …

  11. Africa's orphaned generations

    The HIV/AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa has already orphaned a generation of children - and now seems set to orphan generations more.Today, over 11 million children under the age of 15 living in sub-Saharan Africa have been robbed of one or both parents by HIV/AIDS. Seven years from now, the number is expected tp have grown to 20 million. At that point, anywhere from 15 per cent to over 25 per cent of the children in a dozen sub-Saharan African countries will be orphans - the vast majority of them will have been orphaned by HIV/AIDS. …

  12. AIDS treatment and intrahousehold resource allocations: children's nutrition and schooling in Kenya

    The provision of life-saving antiretroviral (ARV) treatment has emerged as a key component of the global response to HIV/AIDS, but very little is known about the impact of this intervention on the welfare of children in the households of treated persons. We estimate the impact of ARV treatment on children's schooling and nutrition outcomes using longitudinal household survey data collected in collaboration with a treatment program in western Kenya. …

  13. A Situation Analysis of Orphan Children in Namibia

    The purpose of the study was to analyse and provide an understanding of the present situation of orphaned children in the country.The study report and recommendations will be used by different sectors of the society, including Government, non-governmental organizations, community-based organizations, civil society and others to address issues such as: Policy development that needs to address not only material or physical rights but also knowledge and skills as well as psychosocial care; Putting support systems in place to help families and communities cope with caring for their orphaned childr …

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