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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. The impact of HIV/ AIDS on the education system in Namibia

    This Country paper on HIV/AIDS and Education in Namibia was presented at IIEP workshop organized in September 2000 in Paris. It describes the current status and recent trends in the Namibian education sector and provides an overview of future directions and requirements, presenting programmes on HIV/AIDS in the country and their objectives. The role of education in addressing issues of HIV/AIDS is outlined, with a particular mission of the HIV/AIDS Committee and its five years plan (2001-2006). Finally, the training needs of the Ministry of Basic Education, Sports and Culture are identified.

  2. The impact of AIDS on the education sector in South Africa

    This paper discusses the methodology and some of the key issues of an assessment of the potential impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on the education sector in South Africa, conducted by Abt Associates in 1999/2000. Specific findings are not presented, as the presentations to the Department of Education in South Africa took place in October 2000, and consequently the results were not yet in the public domain.

  3. Manual on Best Practices HIV/AIDS Programming with Children and Young People (version 8.4.2005)

    What are Best Practices? What criteria can be used to define a Best Practice and how can Best Practices be used? How can we promote the use of Best Practices by program staff in the field? These are some of the questions that this manual seeks to answer in relation to HIV/AIDS interventions and programs with children and youth. In order to strengthen the member organisations' use of the Best Practice approach both as a tool and as a process, the two networks entered into a joint venture in 2003. …

  4. A costing analysis of selected orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) programs in Botswana

    The number of children under the age of 18 in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) who have lost one or both parents to AIDS has increased dramatically in the last five years. The number of children orphaned by AIDS in SSA is estimated to be around 12 million (UNICEF, 2006). Many more children live with one or more chronically ill or dying parents and or live in poverty stricken and food insecure households. …

  5. Influencing policy for children in Tanzania: lessons from education, legislation and social protection

    This paper analyses three recent policy/programme developments regarding child wellbeing in Tanzania and examines the political 'drivers of change' that influence policy and action on child well-being. Chapter One explores the politics of policymaking, and the respective roles of citizens, government and donors in influencing recent reforms in primary education. Chapter Two provides a historical analysis of key processes in the development of a children's statute in Tanzania, and explores the underlying reasons behind the lack of change despite concerted efforts. …

  6. National plan of action for orphans and vulnerable children Ghana June 2010-2012

    The National Plan of Action for Orphans and Vulnerable Children (OVC) is a three-year plan subject to review and focuses on children who are the most vulnerable and at risk in Ghanaian society. There has not been a recent comprehensive assessment of OVC in Ghana and the first part of the plan attempts a brief assessment of OVC in relation to their care and protection. …

  7. No small issue: Children and families. Universal Action Now

    In 2007, an estimated total of 2 million children were living with HIV - eight times more than in 1990 - while both new infections and deaths among children have grown three-fold globally since 1990. Around 90% of these children live in sub-Saharan Africa, where 12.1 million children are estimated to have lost one or both parents to AIDS. This plenary presentation argues that children and families have been severely neglected in responses to HIV and AIDS. …

  8. Community Education and Sensitization as an OVC Care and Support Strategy: Evaluation of the Integrated AIDS Program-Thika in Kenya

    In sub-Saharan Africa, an estimated 12 million children aged 17 and younger have lost one or both parents mainly due to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. In addition, several million other children live with chronically ill and dying parents or caregiver, and others are living with HIV/AIDS themselves. These situations have exposed children to various life threats including dire household poverty, hunger, stigma and discrimination, abuse, and psychological problems. …

  9. Building resilience in children affected by HIV/AIDS

    This handbook is aimed at helping parents, caregivers and teachers to understand children who are nursing a diseased parent or who have lost a parent, thus, providing practical advice on how to support such children in order to help them cope. It offers ideas for discussions that can be held on a one-to-one basis in the child's home or with a group of children in the classroom. It is not considered as a recipe for success or a book of rules. …

  10. The impact of the AIDS epidemic on schooling in sub-Saharan Africa

    This report assesses the actual and likely impacts of HIV/AIDS epidemic on schooling in sub-Saharan Africa. In particular, it reviews available evidence concerning the school attendance of orphans and morbidity and mortality among teachers in high prevalence countries. The main conclusion is that, while the epidemic poses a sizeable threat to the provision of basic and other education and training in some African countries, the likely overall impact of the epidemic in the continent as a whole will not be as catastrophic as has been widely suggested.

  11. The impact of HIV/AIDS on education in Botswana

    Since independence, Botswana has made great strides in economic and human development. In education, almost 100% of children now enrol in primary school, over 90% start secondary school and girls have enrollment rates similar to those of boys. However, Botswana's HIV epidemic is one of the world's most severe. The 2000 national antenatal survey of pregnant women found that 38.5% were HIV-positive and it is estimated that around one third of the adult population is infected. This presents a major challenge to further development and improvement in the accessibility and quality of education. …

  12. The education sectors' responses to the needs and vulnerabilities of children affected by HIV/AIDS

    Education is a crucial factor in the development of a child. In the light of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, education has become even more vital. The paradox, nevertheless, is that the pandemic has constrained school attendance, as well as school performance. The purpose of this study was to establish to what extent primary school-aged children affected by HIV/AIDS (CABA) are educationally affected, as well as to find out how the education sector is responding to the problems CABA face. …

  13. School-centred HIV and AIDS care and support in Southern Africa: technical consultation report 22-24 May 2007, Gaborone, Botswana

    This report provides a synthesis of discussions held at a UNESCO technical consultation on school-centred care and support in Southern Africa, held from 22 to 24 May 2007 in Gaborone, Botswana. The event brought together representatives from ministries of education, international and local NGOs and UNAIDS cosponsors. The report highlights a set of principles and the key elements needed to provide integrated care and support services for vulnerable children in schools.

  14. Responding to the education needs of children and adolescents affected by AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa. Report on Town Hall Meeting, October 23, 2001

    On October 23, 2001, more than 100 people gathered at Peace Corps headquarters in Washington, D.C., for the third in a series of Town Hall Meetings to address the needs of orphans and vulnerable children in developing countries. The meeting focused on the challenge of educating children and adolescents affected by AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa. By bringing together participants from a wide range of groups, including from both the education and health sectors, organizers hoped to stimulate a useful exchange of information. …

  15. Reasons for non-attendance of orphans, children from disjointed families who live with both parents: Evidence from questionnaires and children's drawings

    The paper uses a combination of questionnaire data and children's drawings to explore the reasons contributing to temporary and permanent absence from school of orphans, children from disjointed families and children who live with both parents. Particular attention is paid to differences between these three groups of children and between girls and boys. It is shown that the most important reasons for absenteeism are closely related to poverty, and that poverty is not necessarily related to orphanhood. …

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