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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. The impact of AIDS on the education sector in South Africa

    This paper discusses the methodology and some of the key issues of an assessment of the potential impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on the education sector in South Africa, conducted by Abt Associates in 1999/2000. Specific findings are not presented, as the presentations to the Department of Education in South Africa took place in October 2000, and consequently the results were not yet in the public domain.

  2. Poverty, AIDS and children's schooling: a targeting dilemma

    This paper analyzes the relationship between orphan status, household wealth, and child school enrollment using data collected in the 1990s from 28 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean, with one country in Southeast Asia. The findings point to considerable diversity - so much so that generalizations are not possible. While there are some examples of large differentials in enrollment by orphan status, in the majority of cases the orphan enrollment gap is dwarfed by the gap between children from richer and poorer households. …

  3. Influencing policy for children in Tanzania: lessons from education, legislation and social protection

    This paper analyses three recent policy/programme developments regarding child wellbeing in Tanzania and examines the political 'drivers of change' that influence policy and action on child well-being. Chapter One explores the politics of policymaking, and the respective roles of citizens, government and donors in influencing recent reforms in primary education. Chapter Two provides a historical analysis of key processes in the development of a children's statute in Tanzania, and explores the underlying reasons behind the lack of change despite concerted efforts. …

  4. Community Education and Sensitization as an OVC Care and Support Strategy: Evaluation of the Integrated AIDS Program-Thika in Kenya

    In sub-Saharan Africa, an estimated 12 million children aged 17 and younger have lost one or both parents mainly due to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. In addition, several million other children live with chronically ill and dying parents or caregiver, and others are living with HIV/AIDS themselves. These situations have exposed children to various life threats including dire household poverty, hunger, stigma and discrimination, abuse, and psychological problems. …

  5. Where the heart is: meeting the psychosocial needs of young children in the context of HIV/AIDS

    An output of a series of workshops on psychosocial support held in 2004-2005 by the Bernard van Leer Foundation and the Coalition on Children Affected by AIDS. Authors Linda Richter, Geoff Foster and Lorraine Sherr discuss the issues surrounding psychosocial care and support for children made vulnerable by the HIV/AIDS pandemic and make recommendations for future priorities and programming directions. Includes the ""Call To Action"" for Toronto 2006.

  6. The power of early childhood as a healing force in the AIDS crisis

    HIV/AIDS confronts the world and all who are committed to ECD with the challenges of: Preventing the transmission of HIV from parent to child; Paying great attention to the well-being of the parent-child pair; Responding to the needs of HIV infected children for treatment and care; Responding to the needs of children who are otherwise affected by the AIDS pandemic.

  7. The impact of the AIDS epidemic on schooling in sub-Saharan Africa

    This report assesses the actual and likely impacts of HIV/AIDS epidemic on schooling in sub-Saharan Africa. In particular, it reviews available evidence concerning the school attendance of orphans and morbidity and mortality among teachers in high prevalence countries. The main conclusion is that, while the epidemic poses a sizeable threat to the provision of basic and other education and training in some African countries, the likely overall impact of the epidemic in the continent as a whole will not be as catastrophic as has been widely suggested.

  8. The impact of HIV/AIDS on education in Botswana

    Since independence, Botswana has made great strides in economic and human development. In education, almost 100% of children now enrol in primary school, over 90% start secondary school and girls have enrollment rates similar to those of boys. However, Botswana's HIV epidemic is one of the world's most severe. The 2000 national antenatal survey of pregnant women found that 38.5% were HIV-positive and it is estimated that around one third of the adult population is infected. This presents a major challenge to further development and improvement in the accessibility and quality of education. …

  9. The education sectors' responses to the needs and vulnerabilities of children affected by HIV/AIDS

    Education is a crucial factor in the development of a child. In the light of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, education has become even more vital. The paradox, nevertheless, is that the pandemic has constrained school attendance, as well as school performance. The purpose of this study was to establish to what extent primary school-aged children affected by HIV/AIDS (CABA) are educationally affected, as well as to find out how the education sector is responding to the problems CABA face. …

  10. The Impact of HIV/AIDS on Education and Institutionalizing Preventive Education

    The objective of this publication is to provide a compilation of various research findings on the impact of HIV/AIDS on education in countries south of the Sahara, which is the world's most infected region. It also presents different options available to the education ministries and government decision-makers with regard to the use of education as an instrument to mitigate the effect of HIV/AIDS, as well as a tool for its prevention.

  11. Reasons for non-attendance of orphans, children from disjointed families who live with both parents: Evidence from questionnaires and children's drawings

    The paper uses a combination of questionnaire data and children's drawings to explore the reasons contributing to temporary and permanent absence from school of orphans, children from disjointed families and children who live with both parents. Particular attention is paid to differences between these three groups of children and between girls and boys. It is shown that the most important reasons for absenteeism are closely related to poverty, and that poverty is not necessarily related to orphanhood. …

  12. Protecting the rights of young children affected and infected by HIV/AIDS in Africa: updating strategies and reinforcing existing networks

    The international workshop "Protecting the rights of young children affected and infected by HIV/AIDS in Africa: Updating strategies and reinforcing existing networks" took place in UNESCO Headquarters co-organized by UNESCO and the Early Childhood Development Network for Africa (ECDNA) bringing together representatives of early childhood development NGOs, institutions and UN organizations working in Africa on issues of young children and HIV/AIDS, to identify strategies, lines of action and innovative approaches to respond to the needs of young children faced by the HIV/AIDS pandemic.

  13. Orphans' Household Circumstances and Access to Education in a Maturing HIV Epidemic in Eastern Zimbabwe

    Levels of orphanhood and patterns of different forms (i.e.: double, paternal and maternal) of orphanhood will change as an HIV epidemic progresses. The implications of different forms of orphanhood for children's development will also change as the cumulative impact of a period of sustained high morbidity and mortality takes its toll on the adult population. In this article, we describe patterns of orphanhood and orphans' educational experience in populations in eastern Zimbabwe subject to a major HIV epidemic which is maturing into its endemic phase. …

  14. HIV as part of the life of children and youth, as life expectancy increases: implications for education

    The education sector is crucial to any national response to the world epidemic of HIV and AIDS. The school age years, about 5 to15 years, make up the cross section of any population with the lowest prevalence of HIV infection. This is the "Window of Hope". Education is the social vaccine against HIV infection. But, with effective anti-viral treatment the number of infected children of school age rises, through increased survival. Schools must adapt to having many such children in class. …

  15. Widening the 'Window of Hope': Using food aid to improve access to education for orphans and vulnerable children in sub-Saharan

    Ce document examine les problèmes et les contraintes liés à une programmation de l'aide alimentaire visant à améliorer l'accès des orphelins et des autres enfants vulnérables à l'éducation. Ses principales parties sont les suivantes: une introduction présentant quelques-unes des difficultés qui existent lorsque l'on s'occupe de la situation des orphelins et des enfants vulnérables sur le plan de l'éducation; une description des caractéristiques des orphelins et des enfants vulnérables, y compris l'endroit où ils vivent et les défis qu'ils doivent relever; l'impact du VIH et du SIDA sur le secteur éducatif; des considérations importantes pour l'action du PAM; les interventions d'ordre alimentaire et non-alimentaire possibles pour améliorer l'accès des enfants à l'éducation, aider leurs familles et renforcer la qualité du service fourni par ceux qui s'occupent des enfants malades du SIDA et de leur éducation; et enfin, une conclusion.

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