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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Children’s representations of school support for HIV-affected peers in rural Zimbabwe

    Background: HIV has left many African children caring for sick relatives, orphaned or themselves HIV-positive, often facing immense challenges in the absence of significant support from adults. With reductions in development funding, public sector budgetary constraints, and a growing emphasis on the importance of indigenous resources in the HIV response, international policy allocates schools a key role in ‘substituting for families’ (Ansell, 2008) in supporting child health and well-being. …

  2. Our children, our future. Zimbabwean good practices responding to the needs of orphans and vulnerable children: the "Zvandiri" Programme, Africaid and The Kapnek Trust Early Childhood Development Centres

    This document represents part of a SAfAIDS project implemented in collaboration with the Ministry of Labour and Social Services (MoLSS), which documents Good Practices in OVC programming in Zimbabwe. The goal of the project is to scale-up information generation and dissemination and thereby encourage the replication of Good Practices in the care and support of orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) in Zimbabwe. …

  3. Trends in the burden of orphans and vulnerable children in Zimbabwe: evidence from national household surveys, 1994-2006

    This study assesses trends in the prevalence and status of orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) based on data from 2005-06, 1999, and 1994 Zimbabwe Demographic and Health Surveys (ZDHS). The study examines four categories of OVC - orphans, fostered children, children in households with no adults age 18-59, and children in households with chronic illness or recent death due to chronic illness. …

  4. Orphans' Household Circumstances and Access to Education in a Maturing HIV Epidemic in Eastern Zimbabwe

    Levels of orphanhood and patterns of different forms (i.e.: double, paternal and maternal) of orphanhood will change as an HIV epidemic progresses. The implications of different forms of orphanhood for children's development will also change as the cumulative impact of a period of sustained high morbidity and mortality takes its toll on the adult population. In this article, we describe patterns of orphanhood and orphans' educational experience in populations in eastern Zimbabwe subject to a major HIV epidemic which is maturing into its endemic phase. …

  5. Multisectoral responses to HIV/AIDS

    HIV/AIDS is a crisis that expands beyond the health sector and will soon touch everyone in Africa. It is a development problem that defies easy answers and routine solutions. Therefore, creativity, synergy, and collaboration from all sectors of society are required to find solutions to mitigate and prevent the expansion of the epidemic.Many organizations working in Africa, particularly those not involved in health, have been feeling the effects of HIV/AIDS on their programs and asked USAID for some guidance in how to address these complicated issues. …

  6. HIV/AIDS and child labour

    As the HIV/AIDS pandemic in sub-Saharan Africa grows in scope and intensity, the situation of children has become more precarious. Advances in the well-being of children in terms of social welfare and health, achieved over several decades, are being compromised. One significant change has been the impact of HIV/AIDS on child labour, especially in its worst forms. Where children are orphaned by the death of one or both parents, general well-being - including opportunities for schooling, proper nutrition and health care - is adversely affected. …

  7. Future Imperfect: protecting children on the brink

    This document looks at the impact and consequences of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on children. Different responses to the OVC crisis are put forward such as promoting public awareness and mobilising leadership and resources.

  8. Contrasting Primary School Outcomes of Paternal and Maternal Orphans in Manicaland, Zimbabwe

    Fewer orphans are enrolled in school than other children but the extent of disadvantage-after allowing for their older average age- is small in most countries. Crosscountry analyses show variation in the size and strength of associations between orphanhood and education according to the form of parental loss experienced. However, maternal death is usually more detrimental to children's education chances than paternal death and double orphans are typically the least likely to be in school. These differences are not fully accounted for by differences in household socio-economic circumstances. …

  9. Children Orphaned by AIDS: front-line responses from eastern and southern Africa

    This document examines the way in which the AIDS epidemicis devastating the lives of children and adolescents throughout sub-Saharan Africa. It then looks at four countrys' individual responses to the crisis and concludes with what individual countries do to help affected children and what the global community can do.

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