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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Foundation for the future: meeting the psychosocial needs of children living with HIV in Africa

    This technical brief describes promising practices in critical services related to the psychological and social well-being of perinatally-infected children (aged 0 to 12 years) in Africa. These include the identification, testing, and counseling of children so that they are linked to appropriate support as early as possible, as well as the provision of ongoing PSS to help children and their families manage disclosure, stigma, and grief and bereavement processes. …

  2. No small issue: Children and families. Universal Action Now

    In 2007, an estimated total of 2 million children were living with HIV - eight times more than in 1990 - while both new infections and deaths among children have grown three-fold globally since 1990. Around 90% of these children live in sub-Saharan Africa, where 12.1 million children are estimated to have lost one or both parents to AIDS. This plenary presentation argues that children and families have been severely neglected in responses to HIV and AIDS. …

  3. AIDS mitigation initiative to enhance care and support in Bikava, Lubumbashi and Matadi (AMITIE project)

    The AIDS Mitigation Initiative to Enhance Care and Support in Bukavu, Lubumbashi and Matadi (AMITIE) Project was a four-year community-led, cross-sectoral project to reduce transmission and mitigate the impact of HIV and AIDS in three of Democratic Republic of the Congo's (DRC) major urban centers through sustainable, community-led and multisectoral support to People Living with HIV (PLHIV) and Orphans and Vulnerable Children (OVC). …

  4. Estimates of the Impact of HIV and teacher ART take-up on the Education Sector on the achievement of EFA in Rwanda

    This impact analysis revealed that the number of HIV positive teachers is likely to increase, as could AIDS mortality and absenteeism. ART, particularly second-line ART could reduce these problems and save money. HIV prevalence in Rwandan teachers could reach 12% by 2015. Considerable effort is required to reduce pupil-teacher ratios and increase orphan school attendance. Rwanda can celebrate its successes in increasing net enrolment.

  5. Education and nutritional status of orphans and children of HIV-infected parents in Kenya

    We examine how school attendance and nutritional status differ between orphaned and fostered children, and between children of HIV-infected parents and non-HIV-infected parents in Kenya. Our analysis is based on information on 2,756 children age 0-4 years and 4,172 children age 6-14 years included in the male subsample of the 2003 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey (DHS). …

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