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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. The role of schools in supporting HIV-affected children in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review

    Aim: To establish an overview of school-based interventions carried out to support the health and well-being of vulnerable children in Zimbabwe and similar socio-economic contexts in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods: A literature search was carried out in Web of Knowledge using combinations of the following search terms: support, intervention, school, child, Zimbabwe, sub-Saharan Africa, health, well-being, inclusion and enrolment. A total of 12 articles were identified as relevant to the research question and included in this review. …

  2. Old enough to know: Consulting children about sex and AIDS education in Africa

    This compelling study, comprising of a sample of eight schools in three countries in sub-Saharan Africa -Kenya, South Africa and Tanzania - examines the sources, contents and processes of children´s community-based sexual knowledges and asks how these knowledges interact with AIDS education programmes in school. Old enough to know showcases the possibilities of consulting pupils using engaging, interactive and visual methods including digital still photography, mini-video documentaries, as well as interviews and observations. …

  3. Does Swaziland have enough Information Education Communication (IEC) material on HIV/AIDS targeting children? Research findings on IEC material available for children in Swaziland

    The aim of this study was to investigate the availability of HIV/AIDS Information Education and Communication (IEC) materials to children. The specific objectives were to: conduct a desktop review of available IEC materials; solicit the knowledge bese of children on HIV/AIDS; determine the available IEC materials and their content; find out what IEC materials are developed and used by various organisations working in HIV/AIDS.

  4. Children's access to information on behaviour change, sexuality and reproductive rights: a myth or reality

    The overall objective of this baseline survey was to help determine access to information on 1) HIV and AIDS prevention; 2) sexuality and 3) reproductive rights for in-school childre. The specific objectives were to: document existing behaviour change communication (BCC) materials and programs for children; document the BCC methods to children including the packaging of information and dissemination; establish the relevance of BCC materials to children; compile empirical evidence on the impact of BCC materials on children in Swaziland.

  5. Influencing policy for children in Tanzania: lessons from education, legislation and social protection

    This paper analyses three recent policy/programme developments regarding child wellbeing in Tanzania and examines the political 'drivers of change' that influence policy and action on child well-being. Chapter One explores the politics of policymaking, and the respective roles of citizens, government and donors in influencing recent reforms in primary education. Chapter Two provides a historical analysis of key processes in the development of a children's statute in Tanzania, and explores the underlying reasons behind the lack of change despite concerted efforts. …

  6. School health and nutrition manual: a guide on how to implement programs in Malawi

    The purpose of this manual is to guide Save the Children staff and its implementing partners in Malawi on how to implement a SHN program in primary schools at district level. The guidance comes from Save the Children's program experience in Mangochi district and is mainly aimed at helping staff involved with the new SHN program in Zomba. In particular, the target audience for this manual is the SHN program manager (at the Save the Children national office) and SHN program officers and assistants at both field and national levels. …

  7. Service providers working together to help children in the time of HIV and AIDS

    The combined effects of HIV and AIDS and poverty make many children vulnerable. Through their work, teachers, health workers, home-based carers, community workers, volunteers and social workers come into regular contact with children. These service providers recognise that this puts them in a unique position to identify vulnerable children, and where necessary, connect them up with other services. This booklet highlights some of the ways service providers in South Africa are responding to the many children in need.

  8. The impact of HIV/AIDS on education in Botswana

    Since independence, Botswana has made great strides in economic and human development. In education, almost 100% of children now enrol in primary school, over 90% start secondary school and girls have enrollment rates similar to those of boys. However, Botswana's HIV epidemic is one of the world's most severe. The 2000 national antenatal survey of pregnant women found that 38.5% were HIV-positive and it is estimated that around one third of the adult population is infected. This presents a major challenge to further development and improvement in the accessibility and quality of education. …

  9. School-centred HIV and AIDS care and support in Southern Africa: technical consultation report 22-24 May 2007, Gaborone, Botswana

    This report provides a synthesis of discussions held at a UNESCO technical consultation on school-centred care and support in Southern Africa, held from 22 to 24 May 2007 in Gaborone, Botswana. The event brought together representatives from ministries of education, international and local NGOs and UNAIDS cosponsors. The report highlights a set of principles and the key elements needed to provide integrated care and support services for vulnerable children in schools.

  10. Africa's orphaned generations

    The HIV/AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa has already orphaned a generation of children - and now seems set to orphan generations more.Today, over 11 million children under the age of 15 living in sub-Saharan Africa have been robbed of one or both parents by HIV/AIDS. Seven years from now, the number is expected tp have grown to 20 million. At that point, anywhere from 15 per cent to over 25 per cent of the children in a dozen sub-Saharan African countries will be orphans - the vast majority of them will have been orphaned by HIV/AIDS. …

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