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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. HIV in schools: a good practice guide to supporting children living with and affected by HIV

    Schools are an important part of a child's life and provide a supportive, caring environment. Yet still in 2015, the reactions of staff, parent/carers or pupils, to a child who is living with or affected by HIV, have in some cases led to the child feeling unable to remain at that school. This guidance by Magda Conway is an update of the comprehensive resource published by NCB in 2005, and a collaboration between the Children's HIV Association (CHIVA) and NCB. …

  2. HIV-related discrimination among grade six students in nine southern African countries

    Background: HIV-related stigmatisation and discrimination by young children towards their peers have important consequences at the individual level and for our response to the epidemic, yet research on this area is limited. Methods: We used nationally representative data to examine discrimination of HIV-positive children by grade six students (n = 39,664) across nine countries in Southern Africa: Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe. …

  3. Life Doesn’t Wait. Romania’s Failure to Protect and Support Children and Youth Living with HIV

    More than 7,200 Romanian children and youth age fifteen to nineteen are living with HIV—the largest such group in any European country. The vast majority were infected with HIV between 1986 and 1991 as a direct result of government policies that exposed them to contaminated needles and “microtransfusions” of unscreened blood. Despite Romania’s progressive expansion of access to antiretroviral drugs, these children and youth face pervasive stigma and discrimination that often impedes their enjoyment of basic rights and services. …

  4. Young key populations at higher risk of HIV in Asia and the Pacific: Making the case with strategic information. Guidance report

    This guidance was developed based on experience sharing and problem solving from an expert meeting on Methodologies for Obtaining Strategic Information on Young People at Higher Risk of HIV Exposure, held in Bangkok, Thailand, from 3rd to 5th of September, 2012. This meeting facilitated the sharing of knowledge, and exchange of ideas and experiences in the collection, analysis and utilization of strategic information on young key populations. …

  5. Teen talk : a guide for positive living

    This question and answer guide for HIV-positive adolescents covers a variety of topics, including ARVs, adherence, friendship, nutrition, exercise, reproductive health, positive prevention, multiple concurrent partnerships, safe male circumcision, prevention of mother-to-child transmission, emotions, and disclosure.

  6. Rapid psychosocial function screening test identified treatment failure in HIV+ African youth

    Psychosocial dysfunction in older children and adolescents is common and may lead to nonadherence to HIV treatments. Poor adherence leads to HIV treatment failure and the development of resistant virus. In resource-limited settings where treatment options are typically limited to only one or two available lines of therapy, identification of individuals at highest risk of failure before failure occurs is of critical importance. …

  7. Safety and tolerability of antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected children and adolescents in Uganda

    The objective of this study was to determine the frequency and outcome of ART-related adverse events among patients ages 6 weeks to 18 years. The authors followed up a cohort of 378 HIV-infected children and adolescents who started ART at the Baylor-Uganda Clinic during the period of July 2004 to July 2009. Patients were started on zidovudine or stavudine, plus lamivudine, and efavirenz or nevirapine. Adverse events were recorded as they occurred. Descriptive analyses and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis were carried out. …

  8. Just normal young people: supporting young people living with HIV in their transition to adulthood

    Thanks to advances in HIV treatment, children who were born with HIV are now living into adulthood. Services working with children and adults living with HIV have needed to adapt to support this cohort of young adults with lifelong HIV infection. Likewise, services need to meet the needs of young people who are acquiring HIV in other ways. This report considers how young people living with HIV make the transition from childhood to adulthood and, in particular, changes in services and support for young people that occur during this time. …

  9. Equipping parents and health providers to address the psychological and social challenges of caring for children living with HIV in Africa

    The Equipping Parents and Health Providers to Address the Psychological and Social Challenges of Caring for Children Living with HIV activity sought to better understand the psychological and social challenges faced by perinatally-infected children aged 0 to 12 years in Africa, their parents/caregivers, and their health providers. It explored factors that contribute to the ability of children living with HIV to cope and thrive, and identified the tools and approaches being used to help parents/caregivers and health providers provide psychosocial support (PSS) to these children. …

  10. Foundation for the future: meeting the psychosocial needs of children living with HIV in Africa

    This technical brief describes promising practices in critical services related to the psychological and social well-being of perinatally-infected children (aged 0 to 12 years) in Africa. These include the identification, testing, and counseling of children so that they are linked to appropriate support as early as possible, as well as the provision of ongoing PSS to help children and their families manage disclosure, stigma, and grief and bereavement processes. …

  11. Education of children with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    Treatment for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has enabled more children and youths to attend school and participate in school activities. Children and youths with HIV infection should receive the same education as those with other chronic illnesses. They may require special services, including home instruction, to provide continuity of education. Confidentiality about HIV infection status should be maintained with parental consent required for disclosure. Youths also should assent or consent as is appropriate for disclosure of their diagnosis.

  12. National guidelines for the care and support of children affected by HIV and AIDS in Pakistan

    The objectives of these guidelines are to: provide guidance for the development and implementation of interventions for the care, support and protection of children affected by HIV and AIDS in Pakistan; provide minimum standards of practice related to all areas of care, support and protection of children affected by HIV and AIDS that are culturally acceptable; provide a clear understanding of the guiding principles, and define roles and responsabilities for all stakeholders to enhance collaboration and strateic partnership among stakeholders htrough effective referral and coordination. …

  13. Positively caring: ensuring that positive choices can be made about the care of children affected by HIV

    This report examines the impacts of HIV on the care choices of children, exploring how HIV affects whether or not children can remain within parental care, and on the alternative care options open to them. It is based on qualitative research in Malawi, India and Ukraine, and on a global literature review. It is in response to alarming global evidence on the rising numbers of children outside of parental care, and growing global recognition that responses to HIV should centre on increased support to families as the best means of providing care and protection for children.

  14. But where are our moral heroes?: An analysis of South African press reporting on children affected by HIV/AIDS

    Messages conveyed both explicitly and implicitly in the media play an important role in the shaping of public understanding of issues, as well as associated policy, programme and popular responses to these issues. This paper applies discourse analysis to a series of articles on children affected by HIV/AIDS published in 2002/2003 in the English-medium South African press. …

  15. Blame and banishment: the underground HIV epidemic affecting children in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

    This report highlights the issues faced by children living with HIV, adolescents engaged in risky behaviors, pregnant women using drugs, and the more than one million children and young people who live or work on the streets of the Eastern Europe and Central Asia region. Marginalized young people are exposed on a daily basis to multiple risks, including drug use, commercial sex and other exploitation and abuse, putting them at higher risk of contracting HIV. The trends are especially troubling, as the region is home to 3.7 million injecting drug users - almost a quarter of the world's total. …

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