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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Can we use young people’s knowledge to develop teachers and HIV-related education?

    Despite recent progress in meeting the goals of the Education for All agenda, certain groups of young people are particularly vulnerable to exclusion and underachievement, including children with HIV/AIDS, children living in poverty, and children with disabilities. HIV/AIDS has reduced many young people’s rights to access education, to live a full and healthy life, and to have a life as a child. …

  2. A future of possibilities: Educating children living in HIV impacted households

    Close to one and a half million Kenyans reportedly live with HIV/AIDS. Using qualitative in-depth interviews this study explores the ways in which parents living with HIV/AIDS navigate their social and economic environment to provide educational opportunities for their children. Barriers identified include the economic costs of a free primary education, and the emotional implications of living in an HIV affected household. Respondents demonstrate a persistent utilization of internal and external resources in navigating these barriers. …

  3. Rapid psychosocial function screening test identified treatment failure in HIV+ African youth

    Psychosocial dysfunction in older children and adolescents is common and may lead to nonadherence to HIV treatments. Poor adherence leads to HIV treatment failure and the development of resistant virus. In resource-limited settings where treatment options are typically limited to only one or two available lines of therapy, identification of individuals at highest risk of failure before failure occurs is of critical importance. …

  4. Safety and tolerability of antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected children and adolescents in Uganda

    The objective of this study was to determine the frequency and outcome of ART-related adverse events among patients ages 6 weeks to 18 years. The authors followed up a cohort of 378 HIV-infected children and adolescents who started ART at the Baylor-Uganda Clinic during the period of July 2004 to July 2009. Patients were started on zidovudine or stavudine, plus lamivudine, and efavirenz or nevirapine. Adverse events were recorded as they occurred. Descriptive analyses and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis were carried out. …

  5. Programs to address child marriage: Framing the problem

    Child marriage violates girls’ human rights and adversely affects their health and well-being. While age at marriage is increasing in most regions of the developing world, early marriage persists for large populations. Worldwide, it is estimated that more than one out of three women aged 20–24 were married before age 18, and one out of seven were married before age 15. There is great variation in child marriage practices across and within regions and between ethnic and religious groups. Eradicating child marriage has long been on the agenda of the United Nations and of individual countries. …

  6. A discussion of perceptions of community facilitators from Swaziland, Kenya, Mozambique and Ghana: cultural practices and child protection

    This study is based on data collected from community development facilitators using open-ended questionnaires and group discussions. Four general types of cultural practices were identified by interviewees as posing risks to children and challenges to child protection work: marriage practices, rites of passage or rituals, family secrets and religious or spiritual practices. …

  7. Social cash transfers to support children and families affected by HIV/AIDS

    In response to the critical need of affected children and families, the compelling evidence for their benefits, and the receptive environment on the part of governments and donors, several local and international organizations are piloting cash transfers programmes as a mechanism to mitigate the impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) on affected communities in sub- Saharan Africa. Few programmes, however, are conceptualized or implemented within a broader framework of social protection, socioeconomic development or human rights. …

  8. Getting in line: coordinating responses for children affected by HIV and AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa

    Only one in every eight households containing orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) in African countries received any support from an external source (UNICEF, 2008). This is a reflection of how governments, both rich and poor, have ignored obligations ratified in conventions to ensure the social protection of vulnerable children (United Nations, 1989). Consequently, a disproportionate proportion of the financial burden of care of vulnerable children is borne by affected families and communities. …

  9. Community interventions supporting children affected by HIV in sub-Saharan Africa: a review to derive evidence-based principles for programming

    Approaching 20 years after the first studies drew attention to the issues faced by children and families affected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), evaluation data from programs addressing their circumstances remains limited and clustered, especially when considered in relation to the magnitude of donor spending. A review of evaluation evidence was conducted to derive programming principles for interventions supporting HIV-affected children in sub-Saharan Africa, including care and support, cash transfer and HIV-prevention interventions. …

  10. Orphan competent communities: a framework for community analysis and action

    Vulnerable children in Africa have traditionally been absorbed and supported by their communities. However, in the context of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and poverty, communities are increasingly stretched, compromising the quality of care available to children affected by AIDS. This calls for an understanding of the processes that best facilitate the capacity of communities to provide good quality care and support. In the interests of furthering debate and practice in this area, we seek to develop an analytical framework that builds upon two inter-linked strands. …

  11. Orphaned and vulnerable children in Zambia: the impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on basic education for children ar risk

    There is an emerging corpus of work on the impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on education in sub-Saharan Africa. This mainly employs demographic models to make projections of student enrolments and teacher requirements. However, there is a paucity of research in basic schools to examine the experiences of AIDS-affected teachers and students. This study explored staff and student perceptions of the impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on the education of affected children in high-prevalence districts of the Copperbelt province of Zambia. …

  12. Orphans and schooling in Africa: a longitudinal analysis

    AIDS deaths could have a major impact on economic development by affecting the human capital accumulation of the next generation. We estimate the impact of parent death on primary school participation using an unusual five-year panel data set of over 20,000 Kenyan children. There is a substantial decrease in school participation following a parent death and a smaller drop before the death (presumably due to pre-death morbidity). Estimated impacts are smaller in specifications without individual fixed effects, suggesting that estimates based on cross-sectional data are biased toward zero. …

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